• Hey Guest!
    Enjoy the This Is Anfield Forums but want to remove the adverts? Now you can do so by clicking here.
    Thanks for your support!

Anfield Atmosphere Discussion

Semmy

tho your dreams be tossed and blown
Ad-free Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Messages
8,737
this seems to be a regular occurance at Dortmunt. I watched the Dortmund v. Schalke match a few weeks ago and the BVB players spent some time post-match at their supporters end having a moment with their fans. This is not a pic from that match.

from an article Dec 2014


May 2013


 


DEVGRU

Banned for the umpteenth time
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
10,012
I can't remember which pundits said it but I've heard a few people criticise Klopp getting the team together to salute the fans at the end of the West Brom game. They said that it was more of a "continental" thing and they were clearly dismissive of it.

The thing is - other things that are decidedly "continental" are great atmospheres. Great connections between the fans and the players. Cheap ticket prices. Safe-standing. Fan ownership. Focus on developing home-grown talent.

The fact that something appears "continental" seems to me to be something we probably ought to embrace, not deride.

Stevie Nicol and a bunch of the ESPN clowns were quick to criticize him..only to face a backlash in the comments section immediately after.

Both have since shut up about it.
 

Dortmund fan

It's fishing time!
Joined
Oct 9, 2015
Messages
6,302
:) Almost half England discusses Klopp's thank you to fans for the best Anfield atmosphere this season. Was it right? Was it not right? Journalists, managers, fans of other teams talk about that. It's main topic this week. The same there were in Bundesliga when Klopp managed Mainz and Dortmund. He did every week something fresh new / surprising things and half Germany discussed about that. That's Klopp. He lives his life and people talk about him.

Fan rapport, not result, reason for Klopp’s Kop salute18th December 2015

Ridiculed in some quarters, praised in others, Jurgen Klopp’s decision to gather all his players around him, in front of the famous Kop, to celebrate a 2-2 draw at home to West Bromwich Albion has divided the football community.


Football is an emotional game which prompts instant reactions; one that makes hindsight worthless. Statistics, player movement and individual contributions can all be analysed post-match; so too can emotion. However, while technical ability can be improved, it is harder to change the nature of a person.

Klopp is an emotional manager. He is a manager that wears his heart on his sleeves. A manager that loves to hug his players, celebrate goals and, well, shout expletives if things go against his team.

There is no doubting that Klopp is a great coach and motivator. However, we witnessed on Sunday that he is also prone to moments of pure unadulterated natural passion.

During the match, Klopp became increasingly irritated by the way in which his opponents had gone about their business at Anfield. Prior to parading his players in front of the Kop to acknowledge the Liverpool support, the German clashed angrily with Baggies boss Tony Pulis and his assistant Mark O’Connor.

His reaction on Sunday was not about revelling in a point at home to West Bromwich Albion. It was about building a rapport with the fans and restoring Anfield as a fortress.

Since his arrival Klopp has spoken about many times about the fans; he has expressed his love of the Kop, he has being videoed learning ‘scouse”, he has even criticised them, doing so after they left early during the 2-1 loss to Crystal Palace in November.

He is building a relationship with them and getting them behind the team. Many observers have commented, including Les Lawson chairman of the Liverpool Supporters’ Club Merseyside Branch, about the poor atmosphere that has existed at Anfield for some time. This was Klopp’s way of helping to remove that.

Ultimately, of course, results will define Klopp’s tenure but the Reds needs the fans behind them if they are to make teams fearful of coming to Anfield.

West Brom joined a list that has included Norwich, West Ham and Crystal Palace in coming to Anfield and leaving with a result – in the case of the Hammers and the Eagles, all three points.

While it would appear that Liverpool have quickly mastered the art of beating bigger names on the road, as exemplified by their wins at Chelsea and Manchester City, dropping points at home to perceived smaller teams won’t lead to titles.

Klopp knows this, the players know this, and the fans know this. By aligning the three together and building a strong relationship – a real team – Liverpool will go about making Anfield a fearful venue again.It was also not the first time he had done it and it won’t be the last.

Thanking fans is a German custom. Klopp performed the same act with his former club, Borussia Dortmund, on a number of occasions at the Westfalenstadion’s ‘Yellow Wall’. It worked. Borussia Dortmund under Klopp lost just 14 games at home since the 2011/12 season.

On Sunday, for large parts of the game, Liverpool played like a Brendan Rodgers team. Plenty of possession and loads of shots but without real penetration.

However, had this game been played earlier in the season Liverpool would not have come from 2-1 down to grab a point.

That is the Klopp difference.

There is no doubt Liverpool are improving. If even the master of inspiring a goal deep in injury time, Sir Alex Ferguson, is fearful of the impact Klopp can make, then the Reds are clearly on to something.

http://www.shoot.co.uk/fan-rapport-not-result-reason-for-klopps-kop-salute/

 

datapolo

TIA New Signing
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
332
assuming we all reckon the kop drives the atmosphere, then the first thing I'd do to revive the kop / atmosphere is remove all the seats, and let it go back to being a first come first served stand. The weekly pilgrimage it was back when I was a lad. You simply went on match day and queued up to get in. If it was United, or Forrest (top team at the time) then it wouldn't hurt to get there around 2 o'clock for a 3 kick off. Once in, pick up your favourite spec. Ours was a little over crossbar height behind the goal. Front of the barrier. Get your Mars bar or wrigleys off the field attendant, and settle in for the match. Chant thru the team names as they warmed up. If lucky, you got a voucher for the derby match. Otherwise - all home games were first come basis, and then they locked her up, when it was full. I've been inside at around 2:15 and the kop has been locked. Was the same for over 30 odd years when I started going back in the mid 60s. None of this ticket shyte, with the same plonkers in the same seats every week. I mean, for starters, how did they organize who got the good spec seats behind the goal? For eternity?

Anyway, once it went all seater, I always wondered what necessarily happened to that same crowd of lads who always resided in the vocal zone just behind the keeper. If they were like me, they didn't have 2 bob to rub together, let alone afford a season fucking ticket. You just went the match. Might hear the odd woolly-back, but in general, it was all scousers. Not today. Today fellas are just sitting there half the time looking bored, taking pictures. The last match against west Brom, until Klopp started waving his arms about, the place was a mausoleum. Most matches this season have been bereft of real atmosphere. Not helped by some of the footy quality, but perhaps the atmosphere is equally to blame for dull performances. Don't see us taking out seats. Don't see us making it a ticket free zone. Don't see atmosphere improving much either.

For me, some of our best atmospheres now are created by those who travel to the away matches. Wonder how many of them are without season tickets - and unable to even get into Anfield. I am betting there are a fair few.

The last time I was on the kop - the only tickets we could get were in the very last row of the stand, on the very far right - on the centenary side. To be honest, I felt embarrassed to be sitting there. Even when locked out, with nearly 30,000 on the kop, back in my day, people wouldn't even stand in these corners unless they wanted a bit of elbow room for a ciggy, or a piss.
Great post, just as I remember it!
 

DEVGRU

Banned for the umpteenth time
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
10,012
Klopp wants his players to thank the fans for their support. How can that ever be spinned as something negative.

The british media will spin it anyway they want to if they want to sadly..and have (some, not all the media). ESPN being the biggest culprits.
 



Dortmund fan

It's fishing time!
Joined
Oct 9, 2015
Messages
6,302
Jurgen Klopp has shown us how to fire up the Kop, says Liverpool defender Nathaniel Clyne

Exclusive interview: Nathaniel Clyne says Liverpool’s recent celebrations after their draw with West Brom could define the entire season

At first, Nathaniel Clyne did not realise what was going on. He was shaking hands with West Bromwich Albion’s players when he turned and saw Jürgen Klopp had led his Liverpool team-mates straight to the Kop.

The right-back sprinted over, slotting into line between Emre Can and Simon Mignolet as Liverpool’s players held hands and saluted their own support.

Clyne had seen it done at Borussia Dortmund, Klopp’s old club, but he had no idea the German was planning on implementing it at Anfield.

Twitter went into a frenzy, castigating Liverpool for ‘celebrating’ a home draw with West Brom, secured through Divock Origi’s 96th-minute equaliser.

Clyne rejects the notion; this unplanned, unprompted gesture was simply Klopp’s way of bringing fans and team closer together. Above all, for Clyne it emphasised the one thing Klopp has brought to Anfield during his two months in charge: a sense of fun.

It is an influence that may yet prove profitable for Clyne’s tattooist. The 24-year-old has never won a major trophy, and has promised himself he will mark his first permanently.

Even though Liverpool are 11 points behind Premier League leaders Leicester, Clyne thinks this could be the season – with Klopp’s latest motivational trick simply part of his grand plan.

“Can we win the title? Yeah, it’s a possibility,” smiles Clyne, whose side face Watford on Sunday. “Our target is definitely to get into the top four, and we are in all the cup competitions. We are doing really well. The league is unpredictable. It keeps everyone excited, not knowing what is going to happen.

“I get tattoos when something big happens in my life. If I won a major trophy I’d come up with something special for sure.”

And Clyne believes moments such as the salute to the Kop can help. “We didn’t know it was going to happen and it took me by surprise,” says the full-back.

“We were under the cosh, and in the last minute we equalised. It was a good moment for us. The manager said it was the best crowd since he has been at the club and he was giving something back to them.

“What we did there showed we could get the crowd more motivated by doing that salute.

“Liverpool has a big atmosphere and we know if we get that crowd going it makes us play better. Will we do it every game? Ask the manager!”

He added: “We were all happy [when Klopp was appointed] and everyone is playing with a smile on their face. We are enjoying the game now. If you see him on the sideline he is 100 miles per hour, cheering for every goal. If a bad decision is made he’s shouting. He’s a fan on the sideline. We see him, up and down. It motivates everyone really.

“He is very enthusiastic and very loud. You see how he hugs all the players. That shows support to us. It makes us warm to him.

“There was a real buzz to see him coming. We knew he had had a lot of success at Borussia Dortmund so we were really happy to see him there to bring the same success to Liverpool.”

It is swiftly becoming apparent that Clyne will be one of Klopp’s chief lieutenants. His £12 million summer move from Southampton marked his transition from promising youngster to established senior international.

Considering Clyne was once convinced he would never make the Crystal Palace first team his rise is remarkable. It is certainly inspiring for the stream of well-wishers in Stockwell, south London, where he grew up and where we meet.

The real hard work begins now, though. Having started the summer with unwanted headlines after seemingly storming down the tunnel having played just one minute as a substitute in England’s victory over Slovenia rather than celebrate with the travelling fans – something Clyne insists was just a misunderstanding – he is well on his way to becoming his country’s first-choice right-back.

With Euro 2016 and a “decent” draw against Wales, Russia and Slovakia on the horizon, Clyne feels his time is now.

“Whenever I come back [to Stockwell] I see the smiles on people’s faces and people encouraging me to do better,” he says. “I pinch myself. I’m living the dream everyone wants.

When I moved to Liverpool in the summer I just wanted to show everyone I was good enough to play at that level and play for a top club. It’s a big step up for me, a big challenge.

“I’d played on big stages and played for England. Now I want to win trophies and be the very best I can be.

“I believe I am ready to be the No 1 [for England]. If I put performances in like I can, then hopefully I can get to that stage.
I know it won’t be handed to me on a plate. [England assistant coach] Gary Neville has given me advice on how to play position wise, defensively and attacking that I have taken on board.

“It’s a decent draw. Hopefully we can top the group and make it to the knockout stages.”

Until then, Clyne has to deal with the vagaries of being a professional footballer, which bring an unexpected duty or two.

“The bidding is only at £60, isn’t it?” asks Clyne with eyes widening before being told that actually one anonymous bidder has offered £242 – a figure that has since risen to over £400 – in Liverpool’s Charity Christmas Auction to watch Home Alone with the full-back and team-mates Jordon Ibe and Joe Gomez.

“It’s a good film though, isn’t it? But as a kid it was all about the football for me over Christmas, especially on Boxing Day.

”Liverpool’s next home game is against Leicester on Boxing Day. Beating the league leaders would probably deserve Klopp’s team salute to the fans once again.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/teams/liverpool/12056818/Jurgen-Klopp-has-shown-us-how-to-fire-up-the-Kop-says-Liverpool-defender-Nathaniel-Clyne.html


 
Last edited:

Dortmund fan

It's fishing time!
Joined
Oct 9, 2015
Messages
6,302
Well... This kind to tell 'thank you' to fans isn't really new. In Dortmund Jürgen used it already.

 

Tjfruits

At the end of a storm, there's a golden sky.
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
241
Whats happend to the Kop? I was in the Anfield Road against WBA and there seemed to be more noise coming from the lower annie road than the Kop!
 



DEVGRU

Banned for the umpteenth time
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
10,012
Whats happend to the Kop? I was in the Anfield Road against WBA and there seemed to be more noise coming from the lower annie road than the Kop!
Need to see who sits in the kop section these day's I guess....
 

mattyhurst

TIA Regular
Joined
Oct 3, 2010
Messages
13,898
Whats happend to the Kop? I was in the Anfield Road against WBA and there seemed to be more noise coming from the lower annie road than the Kop!
Well you were next to one section as opposed to a fair few yards opposite the other, I can never much hear the ultras at Palace bar the drum and I'm in a similar vantage point.
 



Tjfruits

At the end of a storm, there's a golden sky.
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
241
Well you were next to one section as opposed to a fair few yards opposite the other, I can never much hear the ultras at Palace bar the drum and I'm in a similar vantage point.
Yeah I see your point mate.
 

ozyred

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2015
Messages
98
sounded like anfield was rocking tonight best ive heard it through the broadcast for a while :well done:
 



redsamba82

TIA Youth Team
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
529
Stumbled upon these videos before and this was the last day before the SPION KOP whent all seater and breathed it's last breathe and heartbeat before Liverpool sold its soul with the privatisation of football when the premiership was created.

Just look at all the local passionate working class fans going the match with there mates who have now been replaced with clueless silent middle class tourists on there day out with all of there half & half scarves and club shop merchandise who wouldn't say boo to a ghost and we get out sung by every set of away fans every home game.






It's gone forever.
 
Last edited:

liver1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,000
Stumbled upon this video before and this was the last day before the SPION KOP whent all seater and breathed it's last breathe and heartbeat before Liverpool sold its soul with the privatisation of football when the premiership was created.

Just look at all the local passionate working class fans going the match with there mates who have now been replaced with clueless silent middle class tourists on there day out with all of there club merchandise who wouldn't say boo to a ghost.





It's gone forever.
There is a movement to get standing back in football stadiums along the lines of rail seats in Germany.

Fundamentally I dont see why it would a safety problem because everyone still has a seat, but they can stand up as well.

One of the problems of standing before 1994 was that you got a ticket to go into a stand and stood where you wanted to. So it could get jam packed in some areas.

With rail seats everyones still got a specific set seat except you can pack your seat away and stand. Its not different from how things are currently in terms of being allocated a seat and then standing, except its a lot more convenient.

People are adult enough to be able to stand rather than sit without causing a safety issue. In fact there is no safety issue at all if everyone has got an allocated seat.

People are adult enough to stand in concerts where its far more packed. This would be 100 tickets 100 standing spaces, all allocated with a seat behind you, its not a problem.
 
Last edited:

redsamba82

TIA Youth Team
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
529
There is a movement to get standing back in football stadiums along the lines of rail seats in Germany.

Fundamentally I dont see why it would a safety problem because everyone still has a seat, but they can stand up as well.

One of the problems of standing before 1994 was that you got a ticket to go into a stand and stood where you wanted to. So it could get jam packed in some areas.

With rail seats everyones still got a specific set seat except you can pack your seat away and stand. Its not different from how things are currently in terms of being allocated a seat and then standing, except its a lot more convenient.

People are adult enough to be able to stand rather than sit without causing a safety issue. In fact there is no safety issue at all if everyone has got an allocated seat.

People are adult enough to stand in concerts where its far more packed. This would be 100 tickets 100 standing spaces, all allocated, its not a problem.
I agree safe standing can be done safely you only have to look how it's done in Germany but can't see it coming back here any day soon or not atall with bring back safe standing campaigns.

As I've said the Atmosphere we was once famous for has gone and will never come back and yet the club promotes the atmosphere to attract rich corporate fans yet they do nothing to maintain a atmosphere in the ground they only want affluent well behaved fans and have helped push out the die hard working class fans who once created a intimidating/humour atmosphere we was once famous for because of the greed in modern football.

I said it from day one that Klopp joined
he will be shocked with the state of our atmosphere it isn't nowhere near as good as his previous club. Anfields famous atmosphere is a myth from yesteryear.
 

ZeitGuyst

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2015
Messages
61
Went to the Sunderland game the other night and took my 15 yr daughter to her first game, great atmosphere and great result.

One blip for me was the 5 little rats stood behind me. Clearly off their nuts (which i have no problem with) when the goal went in, two of them dived down about 2-3 rows wiping an old bloke out and clattering my daughter pretty heavily, when the old bloke who was with his at a guess, 6 yr old Grandson young son and obviously in some discomfort tried to move the rat out of his way and push him back to his seat on row behind, all five rats gave him so much abuse and threatened him which to be honest was way over the top, for the rest of the game they were abusing him and trying to kick and smash his seat and other seats as they were leaving the ground. My daughter was ok and i gave the kid who hit my daughter a firm elbow but at the same time was conscious not to cause a scene and end up scrapping in front of my kid.

I'm almost 40 and have been all over the UK and Europe watching the reds and have also been a little scrote myself in my youth and still like a laugh and fuck around when ever i can but these little shits, picking on an old bloke and generally being abusive, calling Benteke a useless black cun* for 90 mins as well as the rest of the team, trying damage seats are an absolute stain on our club and fans, if i'd not been with daughter id of wreaked havoc with these little bstds.

Other than that, the travelling Kop did us proud as usual.
 

datapolo

TIA New Signing
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
332
These days even when the Kop sings YNWA it is drowned out by the recorded version played over the PA.
 



RedLar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2014
Messages
1,543
Do the owners of football clubs want local scallies like I was, paying my ground admission, joining in the chants, then pissing off home in the rain on the bus? Or do they want an out of towner, who will go the souvenir shop, spend a night in a hotel, do a ground tour, buy a shirt, buy a scarf, by a program, buy a meal, buy a beer, sit there and take pictures, because he/she doesn't know any songs anyway? The former might spend 50 quid depending on his ticket, the other is potentially close to £500 for his night out. The answer is clearly B.

This is the mentality that has killed our atmosphere, along with eliminating standing room, and general admission to grandstands. Seeing people in the front rows of anfield taking pictures gets on my wick.

I don't go the match any more, but sometimes get me mates ticket which is about 15 rows up the centenary on line with the 18 yard box at the kop end. We both concur that, more often than not, the bulk of the noise is created by travelling support, and the kop is reasonably subdued for long periods of many matches. At least, compared to what it once was.
 

DEVGRU

Banned for the umpteenth time
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
10,012
I was at our away match at West Ham last season and we stood for the entire match. Granted the numbers were limited due to the seat allocations and all but it was perfectly fine.

The problem starts when people with fake tickets get in and then the crowd size gets out of control and is unsafe. I think some of you know what I am talking about, in relation to fake tickets.

Impossible now day's to get in with a fake since all the tickets are barcoded and you need to scan them before you can get through the turnstills.
 

DEVGRU

Banned for the umpteenth time
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
10,012
Do the owners of football clubs want local scallies like I was, paying my ground admission, joining in the chants, then pissing off home in the rain on the bus? Or do they want an out of towner, who will go the souvenir shop, spend a night in a hotel, do a ground tour, buy a shirt, buy a scarf, by a program, buy a meal, buy a beer, sit there and take pictures, because he/she doesn't know any songs anyway? The former might spend 50 quid depending on his ticket, the other is potentially close to £500 for his night out. The answer is clearly B.

This is the mentality that has killed our atmosphere, along with eliminating standing room, and general admission to grandstands. Seeing people in the front rows of anfield taking pictures gets on my wick.

I don't go the match any more, but sometimes get me mates ticket which is about 15 rows up the centenary on line with the 18 yard box at the kop end. We both concur that, more often than not, the bulk of the noise is created by travelling support, and the kop is reasonably subdued for long periods of many matches. At least, compared to what it once was.

That is the reality of things at the moment and a lack of care or attention for the last 10-15 years in making it possible for local families or kids to come to home match's at reasonable prices or rather what I would like to call, SENSIBLE prices for people who are not season ticket holders.

But given the economies of scale, demand has outweighed everything with scalpers willing to pay up to 100 quid for a home match ticket to re-sell at 50%-100% more to out of towners who don't mind paying as they are desperate to get a seat inside Anfield especially for key match's.
 

redsamba82

TIA Youth Team
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
529
Blog by a city fan about modern football, like a lot of local working class fans who have become disillusioned and pushed out of there club by modern football.


HOW I LOVE & HATE MODERN FOOTBALL


Do you enjoy football? Is the passion still there? Is it not what it used to be?
Well, it’s possible to love AND hate modern football, because you’ve probably always loved and hated football, you just didn’t always give it much thought. Football has never been perfect, your club has never been perfect, the players have never performed perfectly, the sport has never been run perfectly, and things have never gone exactly how you had hoped. But we still love it all the same, right?
Right?

Nostalgia’s a wonderful thing, though it ain’t what it was. The Parkside, floodlights at night games, the terraces of Moss Side, chips in a cone, a pound to mind your car, mister. The Kippax, outside toilets, mis-shaped stands, Helen’s bell, Gene Kelly, white dog poo, jumpers for goalposts. Back alleys, season ticket books, restricted views, relegation, promotion, relegation, relegation, promotion, promotion. Back in the big time. Trevor Morley’s moustache. Tight shorts. Inflatable bananas and hooliganism, ID cards, crumbling grounds and tragedy.

I’d happily argue football was certainly no better an experience in the old days. In fact, we’re spoilt rotten nowadays, and that seems to be what actually annoys some. A game for the working classes is fading away. But football was a right mess in the 80s. Half-empty and crumbling stadia, hooliganism, tragedy, and as much poor football as ever. Away games were fraught with danger, but if you were young that was part of the thrill. Or even if you were older, perhaps. Then football became sanitised and we gained a lot and lost a little too. Many teams moved to shiny new stadia after Hillsborough, because it was a better alternative than re-designing existing grounds and ripping up terraces, and things were never the same.

And with all this came the problem of ticket prices. Many of the old faithful have fallen by the wayside as prices increased steadily over the past decade and more. Inflation for Premier League football tickets since its inception hovers around the 1000% mark. Lord Justice Taylor really thought his report would lead to an era of cheap seats – he couldn’t have been more wrong. With the Premier League, money became king and clubs ripped off fans for every penny they could. City’s owners have helped out more than many in certain areas, but prices are still generally far too high, across the board, and across all leagues.

Taylor famously wrote in his report: “Clubs may well wish to charge somewhat more for seats than for standing but it should be possible to plan a price structure which suits the cheapest seats to the pockets of those presently paying to stand.” Supporter groups saw immediately that all-seater stadia would not be used to benefit fans, and so it proved. In 1989-90, the cheapest season ticket at Anfield was just £60 and £96 at Manchester United. And as corporate seats start creeping further outwards around grounds, the “common man” is slowly squeezed out.

For many, modern football means a lack of atmosphere at grounds. It is a problem, but let’s not pretend that every match was a bubbling cauldron of passion twenty years ago. There were games played in near-silence then as they are now.
However, I truly believe that the accessibility of football has reduced the atmosphere in football grounds. Not only do you not have to go to the ground to see your team anymore, but there is so much football available, everywhere, at all time of the day, all week, there is so much to read about, so much social media discourse, that the match is less of an event now. In the old days, there was just the match, the Football Pink and the odd article in the Evening News. You could take a day off work and scroll through Ceefax or re-mortgage your house and phone Clubcall, but the week revolved around matches.

And with football seen more as entertainment, we are obliged to spectate sat down. No alcohol at your seats please. No sharp-ended items either, or bags, or cameras, or anything that could disrupt the Premier League’s product. Live football would become 50% more enjoyable overnight if a section of the crowd were allowed to stand, and if the away support, crucial to a match atmosphere, were not treated as the poor relations.
There’s probably a scientific study somewhere that shows people sing more when stood up, but either way, it does make a difference for me. The thing with terraces too is that with no allotted space, you had to get in early to get your spot, and that built an atmosphere more than in the modern stadia where many of us go to our seats at kick off (or later). Nowadays, many can’t even be bothered watching the whole match anyway. Beat the queues to the bar, beat the traffic too – time has never been more precious.

And dare I even suggest that life was harder for more “in the old days” and football was a release? I certainly would suggest the result didn’t quite mean as much to the average fan as it does now – I doubt there were fans apoplectic with rage after a home draw with Wolverhampton Wanderers or at the lazy ambling style of Paddy Fagan. Nor Woolwich Arsenal fans hijacking polls on their players or pushing their chest forward whilst talking about net spend. Once the internet gave us all a voice, many of us gradually became a lot angrier.

Now you’ve got us all discussing financial results, injury records, team spends, we’ve got the sodding banter brigade, Lad Bible, YNFA, Paddy Power twitter accounts, we’ve got the seat counters, we’ve got the history boys, we’ve got the Robbie Savages and we’ve got the bloody Michael Owens. We know how much ground every player covers, we know their pass completion rates, and we know about every other part of the game, should we wish to. We’ve got ex-referees as celebrities and in commentary roles, we’ve got analysis until our brains bleed, and somewhere in the middle of all that, we’ve got some football matches too after which we slow incidents down to a tenth of their speed and view them from 15 different angles to ascertain how much “contact” there was. I tell you what, I’ve seen them given, and if he’s felt contact, he’s got a right to go down Trevor.

And there’s the little things. You can’t turn up at the gate and pay, you can’t make an impulse decision to go to a football match. You have to jump through hoops and pay money just for the opportunity of attending.
But anyway, age catches up with us all. Personally, the fact is that I’m middle aged and don’t act like I used to, have other priorities and football isn’t the same as it was even though it is just as important, albeit in a different way. I wish it wasn’t sometimes, but it is. David Silva’s indifferent form can really put a downer on my week.

At City, when loyalty could be purchased via Platinum schemes, then the goalposts moved. Elsewhere, when Sky and other broadcasters considered it acceptable to move games at short notice and make fans travel 300 miles on a Monday evening, they shifted further. When we’re playing a 39th game in Dubai, we may as well knock them down altogether.

So are we disconnected from our sporting heroes now? Is this game no longer “ours”?
Are the players and fans disconnected? Well it would be nice if the players acknowledged the eight fans left in the stadium at the end of a game for their staggering dedication to the cause. But seriously, they should. Jurgen Klopp was mocked for leading the players hand in hand to acknowledge the fans recently after a home draw. As usual many fans completely missed the point, as it was not a celebration but an acknowledgement. Holding hands probably isn’t necessary, we’re British, but the acknowledgement is – and players shouldn’t have to be prompted. It doesn’t change my life or view of things, it’s not a deal-breaker, but it does matter, it does mean something.

However, let’s not pretend that there used to be some magical connection between players and fans, players that would get the bus to the ground and have a pint of mild in the social club afterwards. I’ve never had a proper connection with players, they’ve always been a distant entity, who exist in a different world to me. I want them to play well, I expect little more. Those I’ve met seem nice enough, and that’s good enough for me. Others get a bigger club connection no doubt, it changes from club to club, and in the lower leagues, but at the top table there always been a divide between players and fans, at least in my lifetime if not before. Now you have to buy something to meet a player.

What about between club and fans? Well that’s not the case with City, and anyone who suggests that it is worse than it used to be has a very selective memory. The club has never had more discourse with fans even though the Points of Blue liaison has gone, and there was even a fans forum just last week. I’m not sure who went or how you get an invite, but there was one. There was no discourse with Peter Swales or Franny Lee, we had no say, unless we protested outside the ground and waved a few placards and the like. The club was often run shambolically and without any thought to the fans. We had scapegoats in those days, and more of them. More managers too. The club do listen to fans nowadays, though we still wait for real ale at the bar, but revenue is king and it rather gets in the way sometimes.

But there’s no answer to what’s wrong, if anything, really. For those City fans that do feel disconnected from the modern game, there are differing reasons. Ticket prices. A perception of not mattering to the club. Atmosphere. Tourists. Players that don’t care. Modern football. Sky. The entrance music. The time it takes to get a pint. Bespoke pies. City Square. Too many club emails. The half-time entertainment. The tannoy. Wilfried Bony. Pellegrini’s substitutions. The lack of youth players in the 1st team. Corporate seats. Moving seats. Rubbish seats. No Garry Cook. Invisible owners. Loyalty points. Kick off times. UEFA. FIFA. Platini. Financial Fair Play. Smoking restrictions. The weather.

If it’s atmosphere, you could always do something about it. Stay to the end, make some noise, and support the team. You may get more back. If you are silent at matches, you’re part of the problem. I know I am. The club aren’t responsible for you cheering on the team, the people in the ground are. It’s up to you or else have a man with a loudhailer at the front geeing us all up with renditions of the invisible man.
Football has changed, and it will continue to do so. It may not be to our liking all the time, but it’s still football, and it still has the power to provide me with thrills, spills and move my beating heart like little else. It shapes my mood, it makes me swear, abuse, cheer, gasp, laugh, argue, scream and sing.

Same as it ever was.
 

Semmy

tho your dreams be tossed and blown
Ad-free Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Messages
8,737
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ good read!!

Last night sure sounded good from 8 time zones away!