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Anfield Atmosphere Discussion

cardiffpete

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Joined
Apr 14, 2009
Messages
3,625
General LFC pricing (EPL) is about 60 quid and then working down. Last night's Semi against Stoke saw it structured at from 40 quid down. This weekend's FA Cup clash with the Hammers will see an ever lower upper price point of 35 quid (from the 15 prime areas for viewing) and with then prices graduating down from there. That is to be surely applauded. It makes it semi-affordable for many LFC die-hards to get tickets at a fairly reasonable price too. The 60 quid stuff is just too steep for most, especially families etc. 35~40 is not bad at all and fairly reachable for most.

I was not at the Stoke game, but from listening on an increasingly stop-start stream, it did seem that there was a high-enough and a very local Scouse element at the game. I seriously do not like pricing local fans out-of-the-game. It just sucks for everyone then on atmosphere alone. 40m (or less) quid would be affordable in a way that 60 quid never can be.

Most of the atmosphere stuff is just a very high price point, I'd feel.
 


liver1

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Feb 10, 2015
Messages
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By the way Celtic will introduce rail seats for 2600 fans from 2016/2017 as a trial.

And the Minister for Sport has said they will reassess the situation after the trial to see how it goes.

It is a future possibility and there is some momentum here.
 

mattyhurst

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Messages
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General LFC pricing (EPL) is about 60 quid and then working down. Last night's Semi against Stoke saw it structured at from 40 quid down. This weekend's FA Cup clash with the Hammers will see an ever lower upper price point of 35 quid (from the 15 prime areas for viewing) and with then prices graduating down from there. That is to be surely applauded. It makes it semi-affordable for many LFC die-hards to get tickets at a fairly reasonable price too. The 60 quid stuff is just too steep for most, especially families etc. 35~40 is not bad at all and fairly reachable for most.

I was not at the Stoke game, but from listening on an increasingly stop-start stream, it did seem that there was a high-enough and a very local Scouse element at the game. I seriously do not like pricing local fans out-of-the-game. It just sucks for everyone then on atmosphere alone. 40m (or less) quid would be affordable in a way that 60 quid never can be.

Most of the atmosphere stuff is just a very high price point, I'd feel.
Exactly.... Also availability comes into it, there were stoke tickets available on the Monday I believe and you can currently buy FA Cup tickets.

It's not something that is picked up but my first game at Anfield I rocked up and bought a ticket for a cup game that morning and this is 1995. If you are local availability is massive so instead of looking at prices perhaps look at locality and availability, it doesn't have to be a lot, I don't think the bulk selling is a positive thing anyhow they should really go back to the every few weeks thing at least they haven't yet gone down the Arsenal route of members only.

Naturally I point you to our ticket post with plenty of tickets for big cup games, and it was a big game Wednesday and Klopp will likely play a decent team vs West Ham why not take advantage of these? After all the Man Utd game was a snooze fest.
 

cardiffpete

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Messages
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Exactly.... Also availability comes into it, there were stoke tickets available on the Monday I believe and you can currently buy FA Cup tickets.

It's not something that is picked up but my first game at Anfield I rocked up and bought a ticket for a cup game that morning and this is 1995. If you are local availability is massive so instead of looking at prices perhaps look at locality and availability, it doesn't have to be a lot, I don't think the bulk selling is a positive thing anyhow they should really go back to the every few weeks thing at least they haven't yet gone down the Arsenal route of members only.

Naturally I point you to our ticket post with plenty of tickets for big cup games, and it was a big game Wednesday and Klopp will likely play a decent team vs West Ham why not take advantage of these? After all the Man Utd game was a snooze fest.
Absolutely agree.

I do love the cash-back refund initiative of 75 quid just announced for our 17~21 year old fans, who have already shelled-out for season tickets here. This type of initiative is long overdue. We (as a club) badly need to really promote our younger fan-base and to thus make it semi-affordable for them to attend matches. There are just too many grey hairs in the stands nowadays, as football has increasingly become a middle-aged (and upwards) past-time. Nothing wrong with any age demographic being in the majority, but young fans will always cheer more and will always support us unconditionally too. The very noticeable A decade or two ago, LFC probably had a very strong age demographic in the 16~34 range and also a very clear and maybe even 75% greater Merseyside fan-base. I do still sometimes re-watch the 1987~88 compilation stuff and usually about once a year at minimum, and all the chants are with a very heavy and immediately recognizable Scouse accent on show. Those were the days!!

I also remember (as you say) just how easy it was to simply line-up at Anfield itself in the many days preceding most matches and to just simply buy a ticket (or more) then and there. The system was a bit flawed though, as very often the one ahead of you would just buy 20~30 tickets aka a known tout. That always did bug me a bit, but in our glory days, Anfield very rarely ever sold-out and for example in the 1983~4 season home attendance averaged maybe about 30~32K for most matches ...and empty seats were almost everywhere (despite us winning almost everything that season). Under Fagan, we blitzed the League, took the League Cup and also added old big ears and the CL equivalent too, for a 3 trophy haul.

We were very much the best team in the world then, bar absolutely nobody (Our starting XI back then was Brucie- Neal Lawro Hansen Kennedy - Craig Souey Lee Whelan- Kenny Rushie ...which was just insane talent and almost Barca-like in it's utter quality in all slots. At least 5 of our players was probably best-in-the-world in his position, in that team) ...but and yet about quarter of the ground was all-season empty. Go figure that!! I think that it was very related then to the weekend ferries from Ireland (which made up about 25% of our match-day fan-base back then) being on strike, and also Liverpool Dock 8 (aka the direct Irish ferries) being re-developed, which forced them to divert to Holyhead instead and hours on a bus from there. Most people do not like hours of extra effort, so many just stayed away ...and most of Merseyside (proper) is mostly Everton fans anyway (I would guess about a 65/35 split - and it's not in our favour either) ...so we simple could not even come close to selling Anfield out in this time-frame. So no surprise that LFC just "accommodated" the touts and turned a blind-eye here.

So, you might say that it's much fairer to do online-ticketing stuff and to impose ration-based stuff and various restrictions. I do have a an semi-irrational dislike of block-selling though. One, it's an incredibly hefty outlay all at once and a massive purse-hit and two, match dates and times are always subject-to-change for TV or else competition clashes ...so maybe 33% percent of the games will be altered, post-purchase and then you just are buying "blind". You want to lock fans in for months ahead ...but what about if they can't make a 20:45 p.m. kick-off on a Tuesday, 250 miles down country? Bad luck maybe?

These days Anfield sells out for most matches and very easily too, although we as a club are not very successful anymore. But local (Merseyside based) access to match-day tickets is fairly difficult and more restricted. I can long for the "old days" here, but any fan of LFC anywhere does also have the right to attend games, on an equal footing too. I do always prefer the idea of local Scousers being able to get tickets though, as there is then surely a much better "connection" to the team and a more likely vocal level of support . These days our away games are much better atmosphere-wise, as it's still mostly a very die-hard core-group of very fanatical LFC fans who do attend these matches.

Myself and I can still get ticket(s) to almost every match. I'm related to a former (and very prominent) LFC coaching-staff guy (and everyone else in the entire family is an Evertonian) and LFC (and every other EPL team too) always reserves tickets for former players and coaches, as well as all current players also getting a specific allotment. Nepotism does rule here, haha. I do like to pay-my-own-way and mostly (down-the-years) I always have ...but for any game that I cannot buy or beg, steal or borrow tickets for - it's just a phone call away, like Wembley next month too. I will abuse this privilege too, if I have to, but it's not abusing anyway, as no other pick-up on these tickets from within family. I have been (trying to) attend a much higher amount of matches this past 2~3 seasons (and very many this season) , after many years of only a small few and very occasional games a year.

It is very tough now, for so many Liverpool based LFC fans though, to get to games. The allocation system is not optimal.
 
Last edited:

Tjfruits

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Does anyone else thinks that going back to selling the tickets at the ground a few days before would be a good idea?
Bearing in mind there would be some system to deal with touts(ticket limits)
 



Kloppite

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Does anyone else thinks that going back to selling the tickets at the ground a few days before would be a good idea?
Bearing in mind there would be some system to deal with touts(ticket limits)
This would address one of the main issues facing younger fans trying to get tickets. As it stands, the hoops you have to jump through to get a ticket with so many games from the previous season or specific games from this season being a prerequisite for most games are just untenable. Sometimes you just can't get the time off work, sometimes you're away from the city, sometimes you just don't have the money.

I've tried to get a few sets of tickets this season without games recorded last season and I've only managed to get to two matches. By the time they're on general sale they're all usually sold out, and when they aren't I never seem to be able to get them in the basket before someone else. The last game I tried to get general sale tickets for there were about 3 stands with seats left, every time I picked a stand and added tickets to the basket it was sold out, when I went back, the same thing happened with the next stand.

I'd happily camp out for a few hours before tickets went on sale at the box office on the off chance I could get a ticket without all the hoops. Even if they just reserved a thousand or so tickets for physical sale it would be an improvement.

There's a definite demographic bias to the current method of selling tickets, especially block selling as mentioned above, and while it's obviously successful at both selling out the ground and limiting the profits of touts it does hurt some of the groups of fans who would love to be at the ground.
 

mattyhurst

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I think you still have to allow for people to buy online or on the phone after all we all have to work to actually buy a ticket. I'm never really sure why they sell more than 2 to anyone anyhow (That's just me, maybe you should just get your lazy mates to buy there own, I don't include children in this mind).

Why should someone with a season ticket (and I'm not totally sure this is the case be able to buy 4 tickets?) Considering how impossible it actually is to get a season ticket.

Though this is my view by all means think of reasons why what I said is wrong I just think the way we currently sell is very poor.
 

DEVGRU

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I think you still have to allow for people to buy online or on the phone after all we all have to work to actually buy a ticket. I'm never really sure why they sell more than 2 to anyone anyhow (That's just me, maybe you should just get your lazy mates to buy there own, I don't include children in this mind).

Why should someone with a season ticket (and I'm not totally sure this is the case be able to buy 4 tickets?) Considering how impossible it actually is to get a season ticket.

Though this is my view by all means think of reasons why what I said is wrong I just think the way we currently sell is very poor.
I have to agree with you on this...some ticketing decisions that potentially need some re-consideration.
 

Tjfruits

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I think 50% of tickets should be sold at the ground. 25% online. 20% on the phone to UK based numbers and 5% to foreign based number.
 

DEVGRU

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Does anyone else thinks that going back to selling the tickets at the ground a few days before would be a good idea?
Bearing in mind there would be some system to deal with touts(ticket limits)
The tout problem will never go away...tickets are not sold to individuals with ID's for those tickets but it is not as bad these day's as it used to be in the 80's and 90's. They just got smarter. They went online.
 



FritzWalterndCatfishing

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In my opinon are simple too many (sorry) "Event Fans" in the crowd. Satured people acd a part too.
But im sure the Atmosphere will be grow with our Teams performance and the way they changed their attitude in work.

I really like our and the whole English Game related Atmosphere when it gets loud.

In the 1 nd 2 Bundesliga some groups of Fans ( Some New Scool Ultra Kids Groups) destroy the game related Atmosphere with permanent we call it "SingSang".. It is terrible. 60 min always lalallalalalal. like a f***in chorused church boy group.

((Not all the Groups of "Ultras" are like the above described. Some of them a Heroic Baste:shocked:rds. in a positive way )) Im "Groundhopping" only these Derbys in the South of Germany. Its Great:celebrating:
 
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Tjfruits

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I think they should make the Kop an all safe standing end(subject to it getting the green light). Tickets for the Kop and Annie road would be sold at the ground?
 

mattyhurst

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Upper Tier standing always makes me slightly uncomfortable and you would only probably see it on lower tiers.

I actually stood for the entire Palace game yesterday right next to the fanatics and the pointlessness of out lawing standing dawned on me.

You have half a stand who are stood, the away fans are stood and most of the fans in two blocks are stood. The stewards make an attempt to get those in two blocks to sit down but that is made even more futile by the fanatics of Palace.

Another interesting thing about that fanatics seating is how many seats are actually not in use at least 20 seats of the first 3 rows are empty and are solely there for the drummer and others within the fanatics.

Effectively for Palace to accept them they are avoiding selling some decent priced seating, wonder if the funding from America changes that.
 

Tjfruits

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Upper Tier standing always makes me slightly uncomfortable and you would only probably see it on lower tiers.

I actually stood for the entire Palace game yesterday right next to the fanatics and the pointlessness of out lawing standing dawned on me.

You have half a stand who are stood, the away fans are stood and most of the fans in two blocks are stood. The stewards make an attempt to get those in two blocks to sit down but that is made even more futile by the fanatics of Palace.

Another interesting thing about that fanatics seating is how many seats are actually not in use at least 20 seats of the first 3 rows are empty and are solely there for the drummer and others within the fanatics.

Effectively for Palace to accept them they are avoiding selling some decent priced seating, wonder if the funding from America changes that.
I get the upper tier part. What did you make of the palace atmosphere?
 



mattyhurst

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I was against standing but I was finally fully converted yesterday, it has to be looked at, potentially the rulings on Hillsborough may pave the way for the changes.
 

mattyhurst

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I get the upper tier part. What did you make of the palace atmosphere?
It's more lively than most grounds I'm usually opposite the fanatics in the stand closest to the away fans it still has more singing than I've sadly expierenced at Anfield in recent years.

Yesterday right in the hub of it was quite something, not sure how it is for a league game as many were none season ticket holders the guy even remarked it was the first one he had seen that afternoon. But yeah it's something I've never expierenced at football which considering I'm attempting the 92 and been to lots of grounds nearly 30 now you have to worry.

You know what is lacking for Liverpool.....songs.... Simple songs Palace have some awfully banal ones but they are effective and if your new you can join in, beyond a couple I'm not sure what we have at Anfield though is that because I've been concooned in the main stand for too long?

I missed the old Kop by a year, though the two European games I went to were pretty special.
 

Tjfruits

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It's more lively than most grounds I'm usually opposite the fanatics in the stand closest to the away fans it still has more singing than I've sadly expierenced at Anfield in recent years.

Yesterday right in the hub of it was quite something, not sure how it is for a league game as many were none season ticket holders the guy even remarked it was the first one he had seen that afternoon. But yeah it's something I've never expierenced at football which considering I'm attempting the 92 and been to lots of grounds nearly 30 now you have to worry.

You know what is lacking for Liverpool.....songs.... Simple songs Palace have some awfully banal ones but they are effective and if your new you can join in, beyond a couple I'm not sure what we have at Anfield though is that because I've been concooned in the main stand for too long?

I missed the old Kop by a year, though the two European games I went to were pretty special.
I do a similar thing to what you seem to do at Palace with Leicester. The atmosphere is cracking there, and most of it comes from the pockets of the ground where people stand. Partly the reason for the noise is the clapper banners, something I am not a massive fan of, but I guess they work! Anyway, roll on tommorow!
 

Maria

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Well it was back yesterday!
Wasn't it spectacular and emotional as well. I think we were all very moved by it all. God bless them for making every LFC fan around the world so proud.
 



Hope in your heart

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Though I'd throw this in here, from the main site:


The Dortmund Experience – A Liverpool fan’s visit to The Yellow Wall



Chris Williams was invited to Dortmund to watch BVB host Bayern Munich at the Westfalenstadion last weekend. Here’s his account of the weekend.

http://www.thisisanfield.com/2016/03/dortmund-experience-liverpool-fans-visit-yellow-wall/



Every once in while something in life takes you aback, gives you a moment of awe. Such an instance occurred for me last Saturday at Dortmund, home of the “Schwarzgelben”.

Back in December I was lucky enough to go and watch a couple of Bundesliga games, the differences for your average fan in comparison to the Premier League was magnitudinal. I was asked to capture my thoughts for TIA and so gave a very honest opinion.

What I didn’t expect was for it to be read by so many and for that ‘so many’ to include the press office at Borussia Dortmund. I received notification on Twitter that I’d been followed by the BVB, which was followed by a direct message exchange on views of football and fan culture that led to an offer to attend Bundesliga’s, and one of Europe’s, most prestigious fixture – Borussia Dortmund vs. Bayern Munich.

Me, a scruff bag from Mossley Hill, and my son (not a scruff bag) had been invited on a hosted visit by a Champions League and multi-league winning football club, one of Europe’s elite. My head nearly fell off.

A couple of Euros later, thanks to some internet cheap flights, my son Mark and I were booked on the early flight out of Stansted Airport on Saturday 5th March direct to Dortmund.

Stepping out of Dortmund’s airport and onto the city bus we were greeted with a massive banner “Wir sind guter fußball” – We are good at Football; I’m sure Spurs fans will back this statement up after last Thursday.

German football is different than its English counterpart, it’s a way of life ingrained in their culture as a full day and night out. We arrived at the Westfalenstadion three hours before kick off by train, the roads around the stadium were blocked already, the bars outside the ground were packed, they were showing the Liverpool v City highlights on the TV, good start.


It soon got around the bar that we were visiting from Liverpool and I kid you not we were treated like royalty; “Welcome, we love LFC” was all we heard, they couldn’t believe we’d come to see Borussia Dortmund – I had to remind them they now dined at the top table of European football and the honour was ours.

During conversations I suggested the Yellow Wall was superior to the modern Kop in terms of atmosphere – I was nearly lynched, “No way” I was told very loudly by one BVB fan.

Next appointment was with Sebastian Frank, media officer for BVB, the man that had very kindly invited us both over to sample the very best that Dortmund had to offer and boy he didn’t disappoint.



We were led through the gates into their old “Stadion Rote Erde” – they have kept their old stadium attached to the new Westfalenstadion, you can feel the history within this especially when you see it dwarfed by its 81’000 sibling.

We then trod the path to the underneath of the stadium, the path the players take to the changing rooms. It’s a wonderful setup; multiple press booths for pre and post match interviews greeted us before we had the honour of sitting in Thomas Tuchel’s seat to pose for the mandatory tourist pictures.

Pitchside the Westfalenstadion, or Signal Igunda Park to give it its current name, is awe-inspiring as it raises to the heavens above with the famous south tribune a colossus sight on your left as you walk out.

Our host took us back through the press office, through the museum and into the VIP boxes. Their commercial setup is excellent and seamlessly brings together the corporate guests and local regulars who make their weekly pilgrimage to watch their team play. Unlike England there is no barrier between the directors and the paying public, no requirement for suits and ties it’s all very relaxed.

Our tour was over, tickets were in hand and we said goodbye to Sebastian – with it being a matchday his day was about to get exceptionally busy.

A glance over to the south tribune, two hours before kick off, and it was filling up. The culture in Germany is to get in early, get the atmosphere going; helped massively by the safe standing and sale/drinking of alcohol on the terraces. Oh England how we can only wish.


Our seats were just left of the famous Yellow Wall, rail seating-like and thankfully we never sat for 90 minutes of play. The atmosphere was electric, the rendition of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” was up there with the one I experienced at Anfield on those famous Champions League nights of 2005 and 2007 and almost equal to that of the old 1980s Kop that my memory clings to; thankfully we knew the words and fuelled by more than a few pints of Pilsner I gave a good account of myself as a Liverpool fan.



English is almost a second language for the Germans and again the lads and girls around us were astonished that we’d come from Liverpool to see their Borussia play, each one of them has Anfield on a bucket list, do not underestimate their love for LFC. The Jurgen Klopp connection just furthers it. We were deep inside the territory of 1909 Schwarzgleb, one of the many supporters groups found at Dortmund, whose area of the south west tribune we occupied for the match; to say they looked after us would be an understatement.

What was played out was a very tactical and attention capturing ‘Klassiker’ in a cauldron of noise, to which the Bayern fans in the away end played their part. We witnessed the first 0-0 between the two rivals for eight years, so I can only imagine the noise should BVB have scored.

German football fans are every inch as passionate as their English counterparts but the fact there seems to be no barrier between them and the club they love only serves to further the relationship. The result is something we as Premier League-goers can, at the moment, only dream of.

Spirit of Shankly and Spion Kop 1906 have worked together with other club groups to try and instil this culture in the Premier League. The cap of away tickets at £30 may go some way to bringing the German culture and model to England; football for all not just the rich.


If you’ve a spare tenner then throw it the way of SoS and become a member of a force for good. If you’ve a bit more floating around then also think about a discount flight to Germany and an atmosphere you can only dream of awaits.

The DFB and Bundesliga clubs know that football is nothing without fans.
 

Tjfruits

At the end of a storm, there's a golden sky.
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
241
Though I'd throw this in here, from the main site:


The Dortmund Experience – A Liverpool fan’s visit to The Yellow Wall



Chris Williams was invited to Dortmund to watch BVB host Bayern Munich at the Westfalenstadion last weekend. Here’s his account of the weekend.

http://www.thisisanfield.com/2016/03/dortmund-experience-liverpool-fans-visit-yellow-wall/



Every once in while something in life takes you aback, gives you a moment of awe. Such an instance occurred for me last Saturday at Dortmund, home of the “Schwarzgelben”.

Back in December I was lucky enough to go and watch a couple of Bundesliga games, the differences for your average fan in comparison to the Premier League was magnitudinal. I was asked to capture my thoughts for TIA and so gave a very honest opinion.

What I didn’t expect was for it to be read by so many and for that ‘so many’ to include the press office at Borussia Dortmund. I received notification on Twitter that I’d been followed by the BVB, which was followed by a direct message exchange on views of football and fan culture that led to an offer to attend Bundesliga’s, and one of Europe’s, most prestigious fixture – Borussia Dortmund vs. Bayern Munich.

Me, a scruff bag from Mossley Hill, and my son (not a scruff bag) had been invited on a hosted visit by a Champions League and multi-league winning football club, one of Europe’s elite. My head nearly fell off.

A couple of Euros later, thanks to some internet cheap flights, my son Mark and I were booked on the early flight out of Stansted Airport on Saturday 5th March direct to Dortmund.

Stepping out of Dortmund’s airport and onto the city bus we were greeted with a massive banner “Wir sind guter fußball” – We are good at Football; I’m sure Spurs fans will back this statement up after last Thursday.

German football is different than its English counterpart, it’s a way of life ingrained in their culture as a full day and night out. We arrived at the Westfalenstadion three hours before kick off by train, the roads around the stadium were blocked already, the bars outside the ground were packed, they were showing the Liverpool v City highlights on the TV, good start.


It soon got around the bar that we were visiting from Liverpool and I kid you not we were treated like royalty; “Welcome, we love LFC” was all we heard, they couldn’t believe we’d come to see Borussia Dortmund – I had to remind them they now dined at the top table of European football and the honour was ours.

During conversations I suggested the Yellow Wall was superior to the modern Kop in terms of atmosphere – I was nearly lynched, “No way” I was told very loudly by one BVB fan.

Next appointment was with Sebastian Frank, media officer for BVB, the man that had very kindly invited us both over to sample the very best that Dortmund had to offer and boy he didn’t disappoint.



We were led through the gates into their old “Stadion Rote Erde” – they have kept their old stadium attached to the new Westfalenstadion, you can feel the history within this especially when you see it dwarfed by its 81’000 sibling.

We then trod the path to the underneath of the stadium, the path the players take to the changing rooms. It’s a wonderful setup; multiple press booths for pre and post match interviews greeted us before we had the honour of sitting in Thomas Tuchel’s seat to pose for the mandatory tourist pictures.

Pitchside the Westfalenstadion, or Signal Igunda Park to give it its current name, is awe-inspiring as it raises to the heavens above with the famous south tribune a colossus sight on your left as you walk out.

Our host took us back through the press office, through the museum and into the VIP boxes. Their commercial setup is excellent and seamlessly brings together the corporate guests and local regulars who make their weekly pilgrimage to watch their team play. Unlike England there is no barrier between the directors and the paying public, no requirement for suits and ties it’s all very relaxed.

Our tour was over, tickets were in hand and we said goodbye to Sebastian – with it being a matchday his day was about to get exceptionally busy.

A glance over to the south tribune, two hours before kick off, and it was filling up. The culture in Germany is to get in early, get the atmosphere going; helped massively by the safe standing and sale/drinking of alcohol on the terraces. Oh England how we can only wish.


Our seats were just left of the famous Yellow Wall, rail seating-like and thankfully we never sat for 90 minutes of play. The atmosphere was electric, the rendition of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” was up there with the one I experienced at Anfield on those famous Champions League nights of 2005 and 2007 and almost equal to that of the old 1980s Kop that my memory clings to; thankfully we knew the words and fuelled by more than a few pints of Pilsner I gave a good account of myself as a Liverpool fan.



English is almost a second language for the Germans and again the lads and girls around us were astonished that we’d come from Liverpool to see their Borussia play, each one of them has Anfield on a bucket list, do not underestimate their love for LFC. The Jurgen Klopp connection just furthers it. We were deep inside the territory of 1909 Schwarzgleb, one of the many supporters groups found at Dortmund, whose area of the south west tribune we occupied for the match; to say they looked after us would be an understatement.

What was played out was a very tactical and attention capturing ‘Klassiker’ in a cauldron of noise, to which the Bayern fans in the away end played their part. We witnessed the first 0-0 between the two rivals for eight years, so I can only imagine the noise should BVB have scored.

German football fans are every inch as passionate as their English counterparts but the fact there seems to be no barrier between them and the club they love only serves to further the relationship. The result is something we as Premier League-goers can, at the moment, only dream of.

Spirit of Shankly and Spion Kop 1906 have worked together with other club groups to try and instil this culture in the Premier League. The cap of away tickets at £30 may go some way to bringing the German culture and model to England; football for all not just the rich.


If you’ve a spare tenner then throw it the way of SoS and become a member of a force for good. If you’ve a bit more floating around then also think about a discount flight to Germany and an atmosphere you can only dream of awaits.

The DFB and Bundesliga clubs know that football is nothing without fans.
Great read, one day I hope to visit BVB! Also one day I hope the Kop returns to days like this, drinking and standing on the Kop, what a sight!
 

cardiffpete

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Though I'd throw this in here, from the main site:

If you’ve a spare tenner then throw it the way of SoS and become a member of a force for good. If you’ve a bit more floating around then also think about a discount flight to Germany and an atmosphere you can only dream of awaits.

The DFB and Bundesliga clubs know that football is nothing without fans.
I do love Bundesliga matches myself ...but it's not 100% true that there are no incidents between fans. German police are always on high alert here too. I've witnessed quite a few knife incidents at Berlin West Kreuz (for example), on the way to some games.

West Kreuz in Berlin is usually the inevitable meeting-point for so very many fans (locals and the more DB train-based away fans) who then both transfer to the S5 / U2 stuff Yes, the atmosphere can be brilliant ...but some real aggro is always not too far away either. It can be really great to just mix with the Berlin fans at the Imbiss's or on the walk in to the Olympia. German fans also always do seem to really like LFC fans too and they will try to talk to you as well.

The Hertha fans will usually do pre-match stuff at either Spandau or else Berlin Zoo (from the RB trains). You seriously do not want to end up amongst the Away fans here though, who will usually be drinking very heavily all-day (on the trains in). You will be 100% neutral (aka just LFC here) ...but heavy drinking can always upset stuff a lot.

Any Bundesliga match and you can almost always enjoy it, just with the local fans though ...but always be very aware of the away support too. You should not presume the same level of give-and-take. Some serious drinking will be taking place there (on many hours of travel) ...so always be more careful then, even as a neutral.
 

Hope in your heart

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Beyond that tremendous YNWA, the whole atmosphere from start to finish was exceptional. One would probably have to go back to the 2005 CL semi-final against Chelsea to see a similarly heated and passionate atmosphere. Ah f*ck it, this one was much better!!!

Brilliant how things have improved lately in comparison to when the thread started, and the merit for this goes entirely towards our gaffer.

Yesterday, he was incredible again, the way he was pushing the crowd all the time to shout and encourage the team was sensational I thought, yelling at the team AND at the supporters, and hugging/clapping them as well... lol

The only manager to have a similar ability to communicate with the crowd is Diego Simeone. Luckily for us, Klopp promotes a FAR more attractive football though!... :)
 
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liver1

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German Media regarding Anfield:

Spiegel Online

"It was a magical night, as only in this stadium is perhaps possible.

It can come across a bit strange when footballers evoke magical powers and make it seem as if not their own mistakes but supernatural powers had brought about a defeat.

But among the football-faith community the legendary Anfield Road stadium is not considered a sacred site for nothing, and on this memorable night everyone felt what mighty magic can be summoned here.”
 

WooltonRed

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Yesterday, during his press conference before today's game against Newcastle, Klopp felt it necessary to ask the fans to "make sure they are up for it". He said it was easy to have a big atmosphere for the games against Dortmond and Everton but we will need the crowd against Newcastle also.
He has obviously noticed the reduced noise levels in games against the so called lesser teams who visit Anfield.
I am a season ticket holder in the Anfield Road end, quite close to the visiting fans. At most games, we are taunted with the familiar chants " Is This a Library?" and " Where's Your Famous Atmosphere?"
It's difficult to disagree with those chants. At the recent home game against Stoke, the atmosphere at times was really flat, even though we scored an early goal and it can be the same for many other games.
Is Klopp correct in his observations regarding the crowd? I think he is, and this is not the first time he's commented. Remember the game against Southampton, when there was a mass exodus just because they equalised with 10 minutes left!!
I wonder if he ever had to make similar comments during his time at Dortmond??

Also, we really do need some new songs!! Ever since the 'Torres' and 'Suarez' songs, nothing else has come close to firing up the crowd like that. Singing the Fields of Anfield Road 20 times each game isn't enough.
 

Celtic Dragon

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Yesterday, during his press conference before today's game against Newcastle, Klopp felt it necessary to ask the fans to "make sure they are up for it". He said it was easy to have a big atmosphere for the games against Dortmond and Everton but we will need the crowd against Newcastle also.
He has obviously noticed the reduced noise levels in games against the so called lesser teams who visit Anfield.
I am a season ticket holder in the Anfield Road end, quite close to the visiting fans. At most games, we are taunted with the familiar chants " Is This a Library?" and " Where's Your Famous Atmosphere?"
It's difficult to disagree with those chants. .
Rafa's back today. I don't think you need worry about the atmosphere when one of the club legends returns, even if he is at the helm of another team. Remember when King Kenny came back as Blackburn boss on their title run? That game was electric. When Keegan came back with Newcastle for the 4-3 20 years ago? Another fantastic night.

It'll be no different today with Rafa's Newcastle I would hope. Whilst my two examples were fighting for the league title, Rafa is battling to save the Toon from relegation (my how times have changed) and that can also produce a tremendous exciting atmosphere.

No, I don't think it'll be a flat, library like, atmosphere today not by any means.

Oh, and Chris, glad you enjoyed your time at Dortmund. Great write up!
 

Tjfruits

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Deffinetley need new player songs, like the Suarez and Torres! What happens to the Sturridge chant? Why wasn't the Lucas one sung for his assist?
 

lfc.eddie

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Deffinetley need new player songs, like the Suarez and Torres! What happens to the Sturridge chant? Why wasn't the Lucas one sung for his assist?
I think the fans wised up and stop celebrating every little thing and celebrate the team as a whole instead? I don't think we were quiet against Everton, Anfield was quite noisy. May not be as vibrant as the Dortmund game, but better than the beginning of the season.