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Anfield Atmosphere Discussion



The Flying Pig

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Reasons given in this thread include the following.

...................................The crowd don't create enough atmosphere because the team don't create enough excitement or score enough goals. The team performances are mediocre. The results are poor. The games are drab. There are no heroes in the team to sing about anymore.....................................

Anyone who wants to know why things can be quiet at Anfield need only to read explanations like this. - Talk about "You only sing when your winning".

I am an exiled Scouser living 300 miles from the ground. I am also an old git who started to go Anfield as child when we were in the second division. Lifted over the turnstile by my Dad, Granddad or Uncles.. At age 9 I was allowed to go to reserve games with my mates. First team games I went with my Dad until I was 13 then I went with my mates. Through my teenage years I stood on the Kop. In the '70s I had a season ticket for the terraces at the Anfield Rd end. Terrace season tickets were a new innovation. Since the '80s I have been an exile and Anfield visits few and far between.

The atmosphere has changed because the crowd has changed, the ground has changed and football has changed. Sod it !, the whole world has changed.

The crowd used to be virtually 100% Scouser, 100% Male, 100% working class with 90% standing on the terraces. The crowd was homogenous, a tribal monoculture.
Any members of the middle classes or females in attendance were sitting with the other 10% in the stands, who were too old, too infirm, too squeamish, too rich or too posh for the terraces

The Kop roared, shouted, clapped whistled or booed. After 1963 it sang. ( Previously singing at football matches was confined to the Wembley Cup Final which was pre match organised community singing with Daily Express song sheets to wave.)
All ticket games were rarities. Turn up and pay at the turnstiles, get there early for big games to avoid being locked out. Attendances in the '60s were sometimes close to 60K. It could be brutal on the steep terraces. Dangerous and exhausting. Crush barriers were just that and had to be avoided. Most of the crowd had arrived via the ale 'ouse. You were packed in, unable to come or go, swept up and down the terraces in a sea of bodies. The intimate physical contact and toilet arrangements made the crowd an unsuitable place for ladies. The crowd felt like a single entity, a wild animal with a life of its own. You were no longer an individual but part of the crowd, and all inhibitions lost you could sing, swear, boo, clap to your hearts content.

The terraces were waterfalls of urine. Everyone smoked. Anyone overcome by the crush or too weak to survive would be passed gently over the heads of the crowd down to the pitch for St Johns to deal with. There was a code of conduct. Violence was rare. Discussions about players were never ending. If you were considered too young to have an opinion you were mocked or given a clip around the ear. The crowd were knowledgeable about what made a good footballer and a good team. They knew nothing of tactics other than defend or attack. 442 and all the modern jargon was unknown. The language was expletive laced. The opposition were respected or despised as they deserved. Good opposition individual or team performances were appreciated and applauded. The crowd admired bravery, skill and hard work in that order. The game was violent. Anyone who pulled out of a tackle was never forgiven. Taking a dive was unimaginable but intimidation and the cynical foul were routine. Players from outside the British Isles were very rare and exotic. There was always a sprinkling of scousers in the LFC team.

There was no such thing as football fans. You were a supporter. You supported your local team. The only football on the TV was the Cup Final. No one was interested in team formations or obsessed with statistics. The traditions of the club, its history was passed on by word of mouth. No one owned or even lived in a detached house. An inside toilet made you posh. Every man woman and child in the tenement, the street and the council estate would be from a blue or red family. The only time you met supporters of clubs other than Everton or Liverpool or had any interaction with them was at away games.
No one cared about Manchester United. You never heard anything about other teams. The only supporters not actually living in Liverpool were exiled scousers.

The atmosphere was created because entrance was cheap and pay at the gate. The crowd was standing, raucous, uninhibited, smelly, unwashed, uncivilised, uncouth, tribal, all male, all working class, all Scouse, slightly drunk, very scary but warm friendly and marvellous. This was their only entertainment and the weekly release from drudgery.

The crowd was not Mum Dad and the kids on a weekend break from Surrey, a coach party from the Kent LFC supporters club, Chinese tourists on a Beatles break or an Easyjet flight from Scandinavia. The only thing these people have in common is that Liverpool are their "favourite team".


If you live in Surrey or China or the USA or Malaysia, Australia or Scandinavia or wherever I am delighted that you support LFC you are more than welcome as long as you respect the traditions of the club ( and try not to talk about soccer,team uniforms, offense, defense, cleats etc., etc.)

I don't for one minute doubt that you are as true a supporter as I am and you really care about LFC and that their performances make you happy, sad, worry, despair, depressed or ecstatic.

But unless you are from a traditional Scouse LFC family you can have idea what being a supporter means to us. It is part of our family history, community and childhood. What happens at LFC matters more to us because it mattered to our Dads, Granddads friends, neighbours, workmates and lots of other loved ones who are no longer here but used to go with us to the match. The traditional Scouse supporter is surrounded by ghosts at every match.

The standing crowd that created the old atmosphere has been replaced by a more affluent, more female, more refined, more civilised and less local and less working class and seated crowd.

Maybe its sad, maybe its good, maybe its just progress but the old crowd and its atmosphere is never coming back.

But the ghosts are still there, so you new lot make a bloody effort and stop whining and don't be the crowd "That only sings when its winning "
 

koptician

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Smartphones are an absolute atmosphere-killer! People busier checking in on multiple social media sites, taking selfies, videoing the game, instead of watching and participating
 

brush85

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PL has left itself in a situation where you only get atmosphere for the biggest of games or when the home team is playing well. Consequence of crazy high ticket prices...no good will. No feeling of being able to be free and enjoy yourself when its cost an arm and a leg to attend.

So for us...when we are messing around at home and have been for over a year now, you get drab atmospheres until something of note happens. But then it needs to keep happening, which is hard because football isnt that kind of game.
 

Kopstar

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I've been fairly vocal about my annoyance at seeing fans leaving the game early recently. I strongly believe that as supporters - this is what we are, not consumers or spectators, which might indicate that we've bought the right to be entertained or are passive in our participation - it is our duty to do all that we can to help the team. Whether that be encouraging our players or intimidating the opposition, that's our role.

If you are lucky enough to get a ticket to a game you should do so in the knowledge that that is what is expected of you. This isn't a ticket to the theatre, it's a ticket to a colosseum of football in which you are one of the gladiators. Your ticket is what marks you out as a participant and if you're attending you'd better get your game face on. If you're not going to contribute to helping your team then you may as well just sit at home and watch it on the telly, you're no good to us at the game. Too many people who go to the game now are too restrained...too imbued with the service generation that says "I've paid for my ticket...now entertain me"...if they're not entirely passive then they are too often reactive rather than being prepared to be the catalyst. Fuck that. Be the R of the Anfield Roar. Be Feral, Be Raucous, Be Primal, Be Partisan and Uncouth...it's not only one of the few settings where it is still permissible it's NEEDED.

I appreciate the practical issues involved - we have lots of fans who may only ever get to experience Anfield once in their lifetime. They may be overawed by the whole occasion, with the exception of YNWA they are probably unfamiliar with the songs, they may be too busy trying to take in the atmosphere that they forget they ought to be contributing to it. There are also issues with many younger fans being priced out and this has had a detrimental effect on the atmosphere. So too has the fact that many season ticket holders hold onto their season tickets for too long (imo). I thought I'd just put a few ideas down as suggestions that might improve things (a few of them I have mentioned before)

  • Make the Kop safe-standing. It would increase capacity in the Kop from around 13,000 to close to 20,000 and, with the Main Stand development would take over all capacity to close to 60,000. Forget about the Anfield Road end for now if going over 60,000 would entail much greater local infrastructure costs. I appreciate that this would first require a legislative change.
  • Prevent tickets being sold in the Kop via outside agencies. I'd make it exclusive to season ticket-holders and members under 23 at a discounted rate.
  • Additionally, the club should place a large proportion of tickets on sale locally three weeks before a game (from the day after the nearest matchday). Have to pay for them in person and show your membership card and sold at a 'local' rate with a significant number set aside for under 21s and members of local junior football clubs.
  • The club has significant additional capacity for corporate entertainment. Can we not utilise that in some way? I reckon there are a sizeable number of older generation season ticket holders that are reluctant to give up their season ticket because it is a way of life for them but yet they're no longer raucous or vocal. What if they gave up their seat but not their right to come into the stadium? Get them a pass so that they can continue to come in on match day and be looked after in the lounges but their seat can be free'd up for a young local supporter?
  • When a song gets started...put the words up (I hate myself for making that suggestion but I'm past caring now, it's about improving the atmosphere again even if the solution might be cheesy).
  • I'd make it easier for older generation of season-ticket holders to give up their seats but remain able to be part of the match day environment in and around the stadium. Get them along so that they remain in earshot of the sounds of the stadium...so that they can continue to embrace the memories of past glories and pass on the baton to new generations.
If we're looking to get close to £3m/game matchday revenue then we will obviously need a sizeable contribution from corporate sales but you could still do something like:

19,000 on Kop (safe-standing): 9,000 to under 23s @ £15, 10,000 to season-ticket holders @ ~ £30 (435,000)

20,000 in the Main Stand (all seater): 5,000 to local under21s @ £20, 7,500 to season-ticket holders @ ~ £44, 4,000 to corporate @ £200, 3,500 general sale @ £50 (1,405,000)

12,000 in the Centenary Stand (all seater): 3,000 to local under21s @ £20, 7,500 to season-ticket holders @ ~ £44, 1,500 to corporate @ £200 (690,000)

Anfield Road End £9,000 (all seater): 2-3,000 to away fans @ £20 (20s plenty), £6,000 general sale @ £50 (360,000)

Total revenue: 2,890,000...

It's mainly dependent on the Kop going to safe-standing but if that is not possible I strongly believe that ticket prices need to be at an affordable level for the younger local fans and, as importantly, available to them. If that means we don't make as much out of ticket sales as we could by exploiting the market then so be it. The more you leverage the market for ticket revenue the more likely you are of killing the very facets that have made our club what it is. FSG are not stupid, I'm sure that they have connected the dots and realise that the reason why a club that hasn't won the league in 25 years remains so iconic (marketable, high brand recognition whatever appeals to them commercially) is precisely because of those factors that have become interwoven into the fabric of the club.

I'm not a scouser. I've never lived in Liverpool. I fell in love with the club as a child of 6/7...all for the simple reason that it played in red. I had no idea where Liverpool was. I had Kevin Keegan's play better football card game. My early idols were Hansen, Nicol, Kenny, Craig Johnston...I felt a personal connection to Grobbelaar because I had relatives who were from Zimbabwe and had also fought in the war. I remember at the age of 8 someone gave me a pair of plastic shin pads with the United crest on - I cried. Then I threw them in the bin. I didn't really understand then the rivalry between the two clubs as I came to do later - but they weren't Liverpool shin pads so I wanted nothing to do with them.

Whenever I get to go to Anfield it's like a temple to me. I don't have relatives in whose steps I'm walking (my old man is a Wolves fan) but I feel intoxicated by the lore of the place. Supporting Liverpool has massively enriched my life; it's given me bloody knuckles, sore feet, stretched vocal chords...it's been responsible for missing dinner as a kid, parental rebukes, tears, laughter and, I'm sure, several undiagnosed heart attacks. It's made me feel alive on so many occasions during my 38 years that I'll be damned if I'm going to be in any way accountable for it dying.
 



Kanonkop

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Excellent posts Kopstar and The Flying Pig (presumably a Pink Floyd fan also - another big tick!!!). You have covered most bases but I will add one further improvement.

It is vitally important to get supporters into the ground who will create the right atmosphere. I don't think it has as much to do with whether you are local or not, working class or highly educated. it's about the mindset. I know plenty of educated, well paid suit wearing individuals who on match day - behave like the raucous supporters they should be. Jekyl and Hyde supporters who have the daytime persona and then the match day persona that is entirely different. I'm certainly like that and I suspect Kopstar is also and many many others.

Those most likely to make noise are those most determined to get in. That is not necessarily those who have the most credits on their fan cards nor season ticket holders - many of whom happily accumulate credits and sell on their tickets for most games other than the favoured ones - often to day trippers etc. That's not universal of course as there are plenty who do actually go to all the games they get tickets for - they are not the issue. They would find a way to get in irrespective of hurdles though.

Thus one solution is to go back to ticket sales on the day - Pay at the turnstiles. Make it a round number and its super quick to pay either by card or cash or ApplePay or preloaded credits on a members card. Half the Kop can be season tickets, the other half pay on entry. That will be mostly locals but also a fair few travelling fans will get there early, queue up and be happy to get in. These guys will all make noise as they really really really want to be there. The club could also scrap this idea of selling the bulk of free tickets in two batches per season. Go back to selling them for each match. That will reduce reselling. That will improve the quality of the supporters who gain entry.
 

legalalien

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Money. That's the top and bottom of it. People who go to the match these days, and I mean throughout the the PL, are on average much older than back when there was a real atmosphere at most grounds. I've just come from the BBC site where there's yet another article on Mourinho, but it includes a photo of West Ham fans celebrating Carroll's winner last Saturday. Everyone in that photo looks grey-haired and middle aged. Clearly that's because they can afford to go and younger fellers, particularly the 16-19 group and young guys with kids, simply can't.

When the Kop was the Kop, it used to taunt the arl arses in the main stand. Every time fans were seen leaving early from the stands out would go the chant of "part time supporters". Yes, I know, among those crazy guys there were some who caused trouble and gave English football the terrible name that it had, but it was their energy that made the Kop what it was.

Unfortunately things aren't going to change much unless there is safe standing with much lower prices, and I don't see both of those things happening unless there is a vociferous national campaign that forces the clubs to take action. The clubs like things the way they are; affluent older fans paying inflated prices who aren't going to cause trouble and take football back to the problems of the past.

Oh and those pompous old farts in the Kop who tell other people what they can and can't do, really should wind their necks in.
 

legalalien

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@Kopstar excellent suggestions there. I hope FSG or some of their minions are paying attention to this thread.

@The Flying Pig a very evocative post, full of memories. Of course what you wrote of there is what made the Kop such a visceral and intimidating experience. I feel blessed to have been part of it. But there lies the contradiction; it is impossible to recreate the Kop of old, but everybody wants that atmosphere. But with the atmosphere came supporters being treated like cattle and toilets from the Dark Ages. Nowadays, people who go to the match are treated with respect. There are even toilets for women! So everybody is in their comfort zone now and the edge has gone.

The only way to make it edgier and more alive is of course to make easier for young people, but particularly young guys as they're the ones who'll power the team forward, to go to the match and Kopstar's excellent ideas could achieve that if the powers that be see the sense in them and take action.
 

Bodger

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Money. That's the top and bottom of it. People who go to the match these days, and I mean throughout the the PL, are on average much older than back when there was a real atmosphere at most grounds. I've just come from the BBC site where there's yet another article on Mourinho, but it includes a photo of West Ham fans celebrating Carroll's winner last Saturday. Everyone in that photo looks grey-haired and middle aged. Clearly that's because they can afford to go and younger fellers, particularly the 16-19 group and young guys with kids, simply can't.

When the Kop was the Kop, it used to taunt the arl arses in the main stand. Every time fans were seen leaving early from the stands out would go the chant of "part time supporters". Yes, I know, among those crazy guys there were some who caused trouble and gave English football the terrible name that it had, but it was their energy that made the Kop what it was.

Unfortunately things aren't going to change much unless there is safe standing with much lower prices, and I don't see both of those things happening unless there is a vociferous national campaign that forces the clubs to take action. The clubs like things the way they are; affluent older fans paying inflated prices who aren't going to cause trouble and take football back to the problems of the past.

Oh and those pompous old farts in the Kop who tell other people what they can and can't do, really should wind their necks in.
spot on! I'm in my early twenties and am struggling to afford tickets. I either have to grovel to family/friends to lend me their season tickets, or I have to cough up a huge amount of money from my already thin figure in my bank account.
I think safe standing would be incredible, a couple of pints and then get everyone bouncing and singing their heads off. I always come to the ground to have fun, sing (the only place my awful voice is appreciated) and to support my team through thick and thin! If tickets were cheaper, the stadium would be full of people who want to go, who know the songs, and who won't be taking selfies etc. Obviously I don't know what Anfield was like first-hand in the 70/80s, but that 13/14 season for me was incredible. Lining the streets pre-match, flags and banners as far as the eye could see. I know we were agonisingly close to winning the league, but every match should be treated as a cup final by the fans.
I think the tourist-bashing is slightly harsh- yeah they don't add to the atmosphere, but LFC is a world-wide club, but some people save for years and years just to come to anfield to watch us play.
 



Kaliberbeats

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Nearly all the coach tours from Ireland sit people in the Kop which I think is wrong. The kop should be for regulars.

Ticket prices are too high for regulars to go ALL the time and the gap is taken up by fans travelling from far away. These people will spend more money on match day than locals so I think the owner's business model encourages that. I'm happy and delighted people will travel to see us play but we should sit these fans together and not in the kop.

We're adding a lot of new seats but at least half will be corporate so we'll only add a little to the atmosphere with that.
 

gasband

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Actually were there a consensus how much is considered a reasonable ticket price?
 

Flobs

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Trequardisa what, Rich? ? Who invented that one then? Never ever heard of it. Volante sounds something out of a Dean Martin song .
Berbatov is a trequardisa, player who justs drifts around not doing anything, unseen than just pops up and scores the winning goal. You won't be seeing any of those with Klopp so no need to understand what it is or does. :)
 

zagueiro

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re singing. How many people know the words to the songs, particularly those who go occasionally??? I dont mean YNWA or FOAR, I mean to Campione, Poor Scouser Tommy those type of songs. Penny to a pound day trippers and those who only go the game occasionally don't know them, so they couldn's sing even if they wanted too. That's part of the problem. Go an away game, be part of the travelling Kop and everyone sings, everyone stands, and the atmosphere generated is brilliant. To fix the home atmosphere it might be worth looking at the profile of the away supporters, and take it from there........
 



Flobs

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re singing. How many people know the words to the songs, particularly those who go occasionally??? I dont mean YNWA or FOAR, I mean to Campione, Poor Scouser Tommy those type of songs. Penny to a pound day trippers and those who only go the game occasionally don't know them, so they couldn's sing even if they wanted too. That's part of the problem. Go an away game, be part of the travelling Kop and everyone sings, everyone stands, and the atmosphere generated is brilliant. To fix the home atmosphere it might be worth looking at the profile of the away supporters, and take it from there........
Aren't they on the official LFC site, supporters club sites, Fan blogs etc?
With modern communication there is no reason for fans not to learn the songs.
Supporters clubs and the club could easily get together to hand out song sheets etc.

However singing isn't the only way to create noise and atmosphere, shouting, encouraging, clapping .... Even if your alien to football surely sitting in a stadium on a cold afternoon/evening a bit of clapping and a bit of shouting (yes!) would be good for the circulation.
 

zagueiro

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Aren't they on the official LFC site, supporters club sites, Fan blogs etc?
With modern communication there is no reason for fans not to learn the songs.
Supporters clubs and the club could easily get together to hand out song sheets etc.

However singing isn't the only way to create noise and atmosphere, shouting, encouraging, clapping .... Even if your alien to football surely sitting in a stadium on a cold afternoon/evening a bit of clapping and a bit of shouting (yes!) would be good for the circulation.
I think the songs and video probably are, but it doesn't seem like any/many say trippers or irregular attenders research before visiting. It's like they think that the atmosphere they are so keep to witness is just that, to witness, and not partake in. Frustrates the hell out of me being near people who have no clue that the atmosphere is shite because of their lack of noise, that theya re part of the problem, and who, when you do sing or shout look at you like you've pissed in their tea!! We no longer go home games, would rather travel miles and go the aways, proper atmosphere to be enjoyed then!
 

Macolfc

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I've supported Liverpool for as long as I can remember, I'm from the north east so many think I should support Newcastle/Sunderland. But I've been brought up to support Liverpool. The first game I attended was when we thrashed Arsenal 5-1 in the 13/14 season, and the Atmosphere that day was brilliant because of how well we played! The only reason I hadn't been to a game before was because I couldn't travel down, but now that I drive I can't keep myself away. Admittedly 13/14 I only got to a few games, 14/15 a few more because I entered the cup schemes but this year I've attenended every league and cup game and hope to attend the rest. I picked up the songs by listening and joining in at the games, I also learnt the hard way by singing a word wrong to Campione in the kop against Basel and been told straight by a local Kopite. Now I sing my heard out win or lose and never leave a game early. I've got to admit I still feel a little nervous attending games especially if I'm in the Kop because I'm not a local lad & Sometimes I feel like I haven't earned the right to be there with them. It costs me roughly £100 per game because of ticket prices, fuel money and something to eat and drink but I don't mind paying it because I love the club and people down there! Personally I think the atmosphere depends on how the club is playing and the circumstances around the club. Ticket prices obviously don't help & it seriously needs looking at.. Let's try give the team a hell of an atmosphere tomorrow night!!!
 

jaffod

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Reading through this thread there is a common sentiment that the best way forward re creating an atmosphere is to get more young, local supporters in. Now I'm all for that, it's a crime the way they've been effectively priced out over the last 20 years, but don't assume that will automatically see a drastic change in the atmosphere.
I've sat all over the ground for cup matches ever since the Kop became all-seated and I've sat next to any number of young, local lads who haven't uttered a word for 90 minutes (or 120 as seems to be the case recently). I just don't fucking get it, especially when i think back to what I was like at the same age. There's a lad of about 20 who sits in front of me with his old man in the Upper Centenary for league games and I swear I have only heard him shout anything once in the 2-3 years he's sat there, in fact the pair of them have a little chuckle to themselves whenever I'm ranting about whatever's happening on the pitch as if I'm some sort of fucking nutcase when in reality they are a pair of wasted seats.
Age has nothing to do with it, the only way I see things changing is if there's a return to safe standing and I'd be the first in line. Obviously there are people who would be appalled by it and everyone's views have to be taken into consideration but I think lessons have been learned and it's a viable option. I'd love to see a return of the old paddock, make it pay at the gate, 15 quid a ticket regardless of the opposition and take it from there.
 



DEVGRU

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I wonder in the post-hillsbrough era of introducing all seater stadiums and a change in mindset of the supporter over the last 20 years or so...if removing the standing sections has killed the atmosphere a bit.
 

Dane

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I must change my browser.
Could have sworn I'd logged into a forum following an English team, on an English forum, in England.
 

AussieLad

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The stewards need to ease off on the fans. Last time I went to Anfield I stood up instinctively when we were in on goal with a chance of scoring and one of the stewards told us to sit down. Really mad when you think about it, can't remember that ever happening to me at any other ground. The culture around Premier League stadiums nowadays is you go to the match to be entertained and enjoy an experience rather than actually going to support your team and act a bit nuts in the process.

Would imagine the clamour for safe-standing is going to get more intense from most match going fans if grounds continue to get quieter.
I am officially banned from Craven Cottage due to standing during an Australia match last year when there was only 5K there and I was in the back row, so it's not like they can say I was blocking anyones view
 

Rambler

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@theflyingpig.. Superb post.. I also started going in the old Div 2 days. I was born a red rather than it being a lifestyle choice...

For anyone wanting to know what the atmosphere was like take a look on youtube for the likes of St Etienne game. Not sure I have ever been more excited or happy than that night.

When I watch those clips I still get goosebumps & I am 25 again....
 



Billy Stevo's left boot

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If everyone took a scarve and held it above their head during YNWA that would be a start, even if they didn't sing the pre game spectacle of a stadium full of scarves would certainly be a step in the right direction.
 

Maria

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@Billy Stevo's left boot
When I went, from what I remember, we all did that in the stadium, even the tourists from abroad held the scarves up. Mind you it was 3 years ago.


But the ghosts are still there, so you new lot make a bloody effort and stop whining and don't be the crowd "That only sings when its winning "
This.. has struck a chord with me, it kind of reminds of an end of an era but the rebirth of a new dawn into the modern world but passing some of the old traditions to the new generation. Excellent historical account of what it was like in the early days and very thought provoking post.




I've been fairly vocal about my annoyance at seeing fans leaving the game early recently. I strongly believe that as supporters - this is what we are, not consumers or spectators, which might indicate that we've bought the right to be entertained or are passive in our participation - it is our duty to do all that we can to help the team. Whether that be encouraging our players or intimidating the opposition, that's our role.

If you are lucky enough to get a ticket to a game you should do so in the knowledge that that is what is expected of you. This isn't a ticket to the theatre, it's a ticket to a colosseum of football in which you are one of the gladiators. Your ticket is what marks you out as a participant and if you're attending you'd better get your game face on. If you're not going to contribute to helping your team then you may as well just sit at home and watch it on the telly, you're no good to us at the game. Too many people who go to the game now are too restrained...too imbued with the service generation that says "I've paid for my ticket...now entertain me"...if they're not entirely passive then they are too often reactive rather than being prepared to be the catalyst. Fuck that. Be the R of the Anfield Roar. Be Feral, Be Raucous, Be Primal, Be Partisan and Uncouth...it's not only one of the few settings where it is still permissible it's NEEDED.

I appreciate the practical issues involved - we have lots of fans who may only ever get to experience Anfield once in their lifetime. They may be overawed by the whole occasion, with the exception of YNWA they are probably unfamiliar with the songs, they may be too busy trying to take in the atmosphere that they forget they ought to be contributing to it. There are also issues with many younger fans being priced out and this has had a detrimental effect on the atmosphere. So too has the fact that many season ticket holders hold onto their season tickets for too long (imo). I thought I'd just put a few ideas down as suggestions that might improve things (a few of them I have mentioned before)

I'm not a scouser. I've never lived in Liverpool. I fell in love with the club as a child of 6/7...all for the simple reason that it played in red. I had no idea where Liverpool was. I had Kevin Keegan's play better football card game. My early idols were Hansen, Nicol, Kenny, Craig Johnston...I felt a personal connection to Grobbelaar because I had relatives who were from Zimbabwe and had also fought in the war. I remember at the age of 8 someone gave me a pair of plastic shin pads with the United crest on - I cried. Then I threw them in the bin. I didn't really understand then the rivalry between the two clubs as I came to do later - but they weren't Liverpool shin pads so I wanted nothing to do with them.

Whenever I get to go to Anfield it's like a temple to me. I don't have relatives in whose steps I'm walking (my old man is a Wolves fan) but I feel intoxicated by the lore of the place. Supporting Liverpool has massively enriched my life; it's given me bloody knuckles, sore feet, stretched vocal chords...it's been responsible for missing dinner as a kid, parental rebukes, tears, laughter and, I'm sure, several undiagnosed heart attacks. It's made me feel alive on so many occasions during my 38 years that I'll be damned if I'm going to be in any way accountable for it dying.
Really like your suggestions for improvement of atmosphere Kopstar,
The above points, I totally see where you are coming from, but some people are quite shy and timid. I was as well, at the beginning, it took a while for me to let out my frustration, anger and joy but once I was encouraged, it was kind like a release valve and I never looked back since ( i was the little kid who hid behind Dad until he encouraged me out). I think the veteran match goers and the ones who know the traditions should encourage their shy neighbours to shout, they would probably paricipate.

Liverpool will always be apart of my life until my time is up and it has helped me indirectly kind of figure out how I should see the world in a funny but positive way. I have had my fair share of Mum telling me off with my obsession, my family, my non-footballing mates don't quite understand it but grudgingly accept that this is the way I feel when it comes to LFC.

I am definitely sure my health has been affected during the trials and tribulations of watching our club's ups and fowns, but in a bizarre way, it has saved my life when I went through some trying and tragic times in my life. I am forever thankful for LFC and I am so positive right now, we will get the true atmosphere back, maybe not in the way it was in the early days when Flying pig and Rambler have witnessed it, but with a unique style, a quirkiness, cool way but with the revitalised energy, we will rediscover our voice again.
 
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Herb

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Just got back from the ground now, a few more observations/opinions from me.

The music right before kick off seemed to be extremely loud. Quickly got annoyed by that, and any chants that people tried to kick off were getting drowned out. Secondly, the ground was still pretty empty at 730. I know our fans don't tend to fill the Kop until the last minute, but hopefully a collective effort can be made to get in the ground earlier and create an atmosphere as soon as the players are out pre match.

Overall I was actually pleasantly surprised with it tonight. First time I've been that I wasn't surrounded by wet fish, around me people seemed well up for it and were supporting all of the players despite a few bad errors and dodgy performances first half.
 

RedForever2014

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Just got back from the ground now, a few more observations/opinions from me.

The music right before kick off seemed to be extremely loud. Quickly got annoyed by that, and any chants that people tried to kick off were getting drowned out. Secondly, the ground was still pretty empty at 730. I know our fans don't tend to fill the Kop until the last minute, but hopefully a collective effort can be made to get in the ground earlier and create an atmosphere as soon as the players are out pre match.

Overall I was actually pleasantly surprised with it tonight. First time I've been that I wasn't surrounded by wet fish, around me people seemed well up for it and were supporting all of the players despite a few bad errors and dodgy performances first half.
Yeah it's good to see a decent atmosphere for a low key game, and in particular players being encouraged and supported rather than pressured.

It serves no purpose getting on people's backs, you encourage them to be the best they can be and you trust the manager to decide if that's good enough.

It's partly understandable under regimes where there is clear favouritism towards certain players regardless of performance, but under a meritocrat like Klopp it's not necessary and tonight at least it didn't seem to happen.
 

Dane

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I was in 203, second back row, and it sounded pretty grim to me apart from a few half hearted attempts from 305/306.
Woman in the back row shouting for people to sit down within 2 minutes of kick off, and some bell end jobsworth steward telling the back row to sit down too.
All in all I thought the atmosphere was very subdued.