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Broomy

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#Best Individual Performance


Matches never to be Forgotten

#12 - Best Individual Performance



We all know it's a team game but occasionally a player stands out above the rest. So who in your opinion has given the best individual performance in a Red shirt in a single match?

(Pick one player and one match and explain your choice in detail with us... Should make for some fascinating opinions....)

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Billy Biskix

TIA Youth Team
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
2,500
This is an easy one. It's Luis Suarez against Norwich in December 2013. Every now and then a player will have a game where literally everything comes off for them and it did for Suarez that night.

He scored 4 goals, each of which showcased his unique talents. His first was just outrageous. It's my favourite Suarez goal, one of the best goals I've ever seen. The ball bounced up about 40 yards out. Poor Ruddy (who'd already been beaten before from the halfway line by Suarez) had wandered out a little. Suarez just smashed it with slice and it looped over his head into the net. It was brutal. Brilliant.

His second goal showed his predatory instincts. Coutinho's corner was flat and missed by Gerrard at the near post. Suarez anticipated, got in front of the defender and hooked it in with his left foot. His third was all about his technique. He got the ball awkwardly at head height just inside the Norwich half. The ball continued to bounce as he moved forward and he was surrounded by Norwich players. Just as he was closed down, he hooked it round the defender, ran round the other side and with the ball still bouncing hit a half volley into the corner of the net. I loved his reaction to that goal too. It's like he couldn't believe what he'd done. No one could.

His fourth showed his deadball skills. A free kick from 25 yards out that went into the top corner like a bullet. Even then he wasn't finished and our 5th goal that night summed up his work ethic and unbelievable commitment and energy. It was two minutes from the end and the game was won but Suarez was still running at defenders, picking up rebounds. He burst into the penalty area and flicked the ball nonchalantly into the path of Sterling for number five.

He was unplayable. It was the night I realised we had a player who wasn't just world-class but was potentially the world's best.
 

Broomy

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#Best Individual Performance

Ah that's brilliant Billy, what a performance that was from Suarez against Norwich that day... I'm going to go for a European Night back in 2007, a night that was significant for me, and go for Jamie Carragher's man of the match performance against Barcelona in the Nou Camp....A night most people will probably remember for Craig Bellamy goal celebration by imitating a golf swing....

On 21 February 2007, Liverpool travelled to the Nou Camp for the first leg of the Champions League tie first knockout round. In the delicate facets of the game Liverpool came perilously close to being eviscerated by a Barcelona team - the reigning champions, who outplayed the Reds scoring in the thirteeneth minute. Liverpool produced one of the most stunning results in their proud European history as they came from behind to defeat Barcelona 2-1 in the Nou Camp.

Jamie Carragher produced a magnificent performance turning in a performance of a lifetime which doesn't come much better than Barcelona away.. In the words of Alan Hansen: 'they've got arguably the best player in the World in terms of technical ability plus others with pace, fantastic ability and many other qualities but Carragher played like a giant among men'.

Jamie was later voted man of the match playing against Ronaldiniho, Messi and Eto'o.
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jaffod

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2,266
Hey guys= let's hear it for our best ever keeper, Clem, and our best ever defender, Jocky
Ray Clemence is the best goal-keeper I've ever seen play for Liverpool. I've seen people on other forum's say Grobbelaar or Pepe Reina were better but I can only assume they never saw Clem play and are therefore happy to overlook him. There's no argument imo.
He had no weaknesses. He commanded his box, he came for crosses (and caught them), he was a great shot-stopper, wasn't scared to go down and risk injury at a striker's feet and he was probably as good a 'sweeper-keeper' as you are likely to see - quick off his line to clear any danger if the back 4 got caught too far forward.
His concentration levels had to be immense - more often than not he would only be called into action once or twice during a match as Liverpool completely dominated the opposition but he was never found wanting in that respect. Mistakes were as rare as hen's teeth and fortunately his biggest one (that I can recall) came in a Scotland/ England match at Hampden when he let a weak Kenny Dalglish shot creep past him in a 2-1 defeat. You can only imagine the piss-taking that went on in the Liverpool dressing room when all the players were back together on club duty!
Clem would have won 150+ caps if Shilton hadn't been around at the same time but for me Ray was the better 'keeper. Shilton was good obviously but he didn't like getting in where it hurt and that's why Ray was the better 'keeper as far as I'm concerned.

As for Jocky, well, what can you say? The coolest, most elegant centre-back I've ever seen in a red shirt. He wasn't the fastest but the first yard was in his head and that's where he had the advantage over quick centre-forwards so was very rarely caught out for pace. Brilliant at bringing the ball out from the back as well where he'd look to play a defence-splitting pass.
 

The Flying Pig

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256
As forum member @The Flying Pig mentioned above there, his early years at Anfield were before subs were allowed. Here's a stat you may not know... The tag ‘12th man’ would soon be attached, and Geoff Strong became the first ever substitute to score for Liverpool when he replaced Chris Lawler at half time and scored the equaliser in a 1-1 draw with West Ham United at Anfield on September 15, 1965.

Many fans will remember him for the 1965 FA Cup Final... The highly influential Gordon Milne was out injured for the match against Leeds United at Wembley, it was Geoff Strong who replaced him and produced a key performance to negate the threat of Footballer of the Year Bobby Collins. Liverpool went on to win the final 2-1, our first ever FA Cup.


Geoff Strong (right) celebrates winning the 1965 FA Cup

Great memories @longtimered, you mention Geoff had problems initially with fitness levels expected by Shanks and our training regime leaving him physically sick... I remember a story that a few days after joining Liverpool and experiencing Bill Shankly's training regime, Strong complained: "What have I joined here, a bloody commando course!"
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Love the post 1965 Cup Final picture with Geoff Strong having a fag. ( for our US soccer fans this is a cigarette !)
 

Billy Biskix

TIA Youth Team
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#Liverpool Childhood Memories
@longtimered, what are your earliest memories of following Liverpool?
"I can tell you first match was Sept 1955, Liverpool 2 -1 Lincoln City League Division 2. Crowd of about 40,000 and I stood in the paddock in front of the main stand. Kop held about 28000 in those days I think - unchanged till 1970's. No singing of course just loud roars when liverpool attacked - and rattles (anyone remember them?).
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When did singing at football matches start and did the Kop invent it? I've always wondered this because it was the singing and the Kop itself that fascinated me when I first started watching Liverpool in the seventies. Seems as though there was very little organised singing at football matches until the sixties. Then pop music started to become part of the pre-match entertainment. In the early sixties many of the hits in the UK were from Liverpool bands, the Beatles, Gerry and the Pacemakers etc and the Kop joined in. This film is from 1964, the year we won the title for the first time under Shankly. It was round about this time that 'You'll Never Walk Alone' was adopted as our anthem.

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Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
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Hey guys= let's hear it for our best ever keeper, Clem
@Zico Nealy, that would actually make for a great debate... Who is Liverpool greatest ever goalkeeper?
  • Bruce Grobbelaar
  • Elisha Scott
  • Ray Clemence
  • Pepe Reina
  • Tommy Lawrence
Ray Clemence is the best goal-keeper I've ever seen play for Liverpool. I've seen people on other forum's say Grobbelaar or Pepe Reina were better but I can only assume they never saw Clem play and are therefore happy to overlook him. There's no argument imo.
We've had some good goalkeepers and we've also had some great goalkeepers. But there’s very few who come close to Ray Clemence... Has any other goalkeeper came close to rivaling Ray Clemence as Liverpool's greatest ever goalkeeper?
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Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
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When did singing at football matches start and did the Kop invent it?
Would be great to hear @OLDIE, @The Flying Pig, @longtimered and @Rambler's memories of this... I always believed it was a song called 'Lets Go' by the Routers that started it all off on the Kop?

As far as I know that song came out in 1962 and the Kop took it up and it became the 'St John Chant'... As far as i'm aware that was the first time Anfield had heard singing with chanting and clapping but I could be wrong... Need one of the older lads to answer this here for you @Billy Biskix!!
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Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
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Messages
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#My Complete Red Players

Which Liverpool players were best 'in your opinion' in each area of strength? Which player do you think of first when filling in the gaps??

Copy and paste the following into your reply and fill in the missing blanks....


The courage of _________
The strength of ________
The tackling ability of ________
The passing ability of ________
The pace of ________
The heading ability of ________
The Legend of ________
The passion of ________
The magic of ________
The dribbling of ________
The shooting of ________
The handling of ________
The presence of ________
The stamina of ________
The composure of ________
The power of ________
The versitility of ________
The technical ability of ________
The vision of ________
The inspiration of ________
The leadership of ________
The integrity of ________
The loyalty of ________
The awareness of ________
My Complete Red Players...
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Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
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Messages
1,472
#My Complete Red Players

The courage of Gerry Byrne
The strength of Ron Yeats
The tackling ability of Chris Lawler
The passing ability of Jan Molby
The pace of Craig Johnston
The heading ability of John Toshack
The Legend of Billy Liddell
The passion of Emlyn Hughes and Jamie Carragher
The magic of Luis Suarez
The dribbling of John Barnes
The shooting of Ian Rush
The handling of Ray Clemence
The presence of Tommy Smith
The stamina of Dirk Kuyt
The composure of Alan Hansen
The power of Graeme Souness
The versitility of Geoff Strong
The technical ability of Phil Neal
The vision of Steven Gerrard
The inspiration of Ron Yeats
The leadership of Emlyn Hughes
The intergrity of Sami Hyypia
The loyalty of Ian Callaghan
The awareness of Kenny Dalglish
My Complete Red Players...
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shankly96

Dissolver of sugar
Joined
Aug 15, 2010
Messages
3,296
For individual performance I'm gonna go with a bit of curveball considering how divisive a player he is among fans and say Lucas, 2011, at Stamford Bridge against Chelsea. The only trophy we've won in ages, and this match was only the only one that was difficult (I know we made a bit of a pig's ear of the final, but it was really a forgone conclusion against Cardiff even if it did take longer than it should have) and we only won because of Lucas. Chelsea were, as they have been for a fair few years now, better, and really we didn't have any right to win. The only reason we won was a ridiculously good performance from Lucas that stopped Chelsea in their tracks and put us on the front foot for most of the match. He did his acl in the second half, and his absence showed, we were pinned back, our second goal a lucky last minute counter attack, and our league form went down the shitter without him. Lucas's best performance for us, probably the only time he'll play a match anywhere near where his potential was (his leg is still fucked) and the reason we won the cup that year, the only trophy for nearly a decade now.


(Tangent rant)
People give him a hard ride, but he was a much better player than people think, and still is, although nowhere near where he was. After the acl he got a thigh strain and missed a year and half in total. In the half season that he was available for, Rodgers' first year, our form improved drastically, something that people attribute to Carra, but it's no coincidence that we improved once he was back. In that half season he achieved the highest tackle count, successful tackle count, ratio of tackle to successful tackle, blocks, and was in the top 5 in the league for interceptions, meaning that after a year and half of injury, and with half the playing time as those who played all season, he still managed to out defend everyone. Then he did his leg again, and again, and each time he does he gets a little worse, and his yellow card count rises, but still our form depends on, look at how well we did this year when he came back, then how bad we did when he picked up another leg injury. Lucas deserves a lot more respect than he's given by some, and shouldn't be derided as much as he is. He might not be the player he was or could have become, but he's still better than he gets given credit for. I genuinely believe if he hadn't done his acl he would've gone on to be the best dm in my time, yes Didi and Masch were better footballers, but they weren't better defenders, neither of them achieved the kind of defensive stats Lucas did, and they played in better teams and didn't miss a year and half with career threatening injuries. If Masch was a bulldog, then Didi was a panther or some other sleek-lined predator, and Lucas was the Tasmanian Devil. He might not have look as good the other two, might not have built play as well as the other two, but he sure as anything could stop anyone else from doing what they wanted, he was a defensive hurricane before the injury and as stated in the above paragraph, the main reason we've won the only trophy we have for so long.
 

hugo the horrible

Ridiculously optimistic.(even more so now)
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Messages
3,502
@Zico Nealy, that would actually make for a great debate... Who is Liverpool greatest ever goalkeeper?
  • Bruce Grobbelaar
  • Elisha Scott
  • Ray Clemence
  • Pepe Reina
  • Tommy Lawrence

We've had some good goalkeepers and we've also had some great goalkeepers. But there’s very few who come close to Ray Clemence... Has any other goalkeeper came close to rivaling Ray Clemence as Liverpool's greatest ever goalkeeper?
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Ray Clemence for me,he didn't have any weaknesses that I saw,all in all the complete keeper.
I loved Grobbelaar,a fantastic keeper generally, I heard him described as eccentric,which is probably right,he had the odd howler though,which of course could cost.
 

Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
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#Best Individual Performance

Has there ever been a greater performance in a red shirt than this?

Gerry Byrne in the 1965 FA Cup Final.... Only 9 minutes had gone, Liverpool were attacking when the ball came loose, rolling towards Gerry Byrne. Leeds' Bobby Collins looked to be set to retrieve it and threw himself at Gerry Byrne, with his studs going into Byrne's leg and his shoulder smashing into him.

Gerry Byrne, our left-back played on despite being in excruciating pain. No substitutes back then, in agony, Gerry produced a memorable performance as Bill Shankly and Bob Paisley kept Byrne's injury a secret. Gerry had actually broken his collarbone.

He managed to play the rest of the 90 minutes, battling away with one arm limp by his side. With the score at the end of normal time being 0-0, another 30 minutes followed.

The game ran to extra time — the first Final to do so since 1947. Incredibly, 3 minutes into extra time, Gerry Byrne beat his man on the overlap and whipped in a cross for Roger Hunt to head home, and the rest is history. Liverpool went on to win 2-1, the first time Liverpool ever won the FA Cup. A heroic performance from Gerry Byrne...

Liverpool's Best ever Individual Performance? Alec Lindsay in the '74 FA Cup Final? Peter Thompson's display in the 5-0 thrashing of Arsenal? Roger Hunt's hat trick at White Hart Lane in a 3-1 victory during the 1963/64 season? Ian St John's Debut? Graeme Souness hattrick v CSKA Sofia? Alun Evans hat-trick against Bayern Munich? John Barnes v QPR in 1987? Kenny's Performances? Istanbul?
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Billy Biskix

TIA Youth Team
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
2,500
@Zico Nealy, that would actually make for a great debate... Who is Liverpool greatest ever goalkeeper?
  • Bruce Grobbelaar
  • Elisha Scott
  • Ray Clemence
  • Pepe Reina
  • Tommy Lawrence

We've had some good goalkeepers and we've also had some great goalkeepers. But there’s very few who come close to Ray Clemence... Has any other goalkeeper came close to rivaling Ray Clemence as Liverpool's greatest ever goalkeeper?
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Elisha Scott is our greatest ever goalkeeper. He played for us for 21 consecutive years! I can't see that record ever being broken. Of the keepers I've seen, Clemence was excellent. One of the first 'sweeper keepers'. He was very agile, a good organiser and consistent. He hardly ever made a mistake. But Pepe was the most naturally gifted keeper we've had. His reflexes were superb. He was a great distributor of the ball. Between 2008 - 2010 I would have rated him higher than Clemence, but he couldn't maintain that level. He lost his mojo once Rafa left and wasn't quite the same thereafter. Shame because he had the potential to be one of the world's best keepers.
 

Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
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Elisha Scott - The First king of the Kop...

It's 103 years ago when Elisha Scott joined Liverpool and spent 22 years at Anfield, from 1912 to 1934... Elisha was relatively small for a goalkeeper, he was 5 ft. 91/2 ins. When you speak to many of the older generation of today, most would choose Elisha Scott over Ray Clemence as Liverpool's best ever goalkeeper...

Everton’s legendary striker Dixie Dean once said: “Elisha was the greatest I’ve ever seen. You can have Swift, Trautmann, Banks, Wilson. You can have them all. I’ll take Elisha Scott.”

Pepe Reina was the most naturally gifted keeper we've had. His reflexes were superb. He was a great distributor of the ball. Between 2008 - 2010 I would have rated him higher than Clemence, but he couldn't maintain that level. He lost his mojo once Rafa left and wasn't quite the same thereafter. Shame because he had the potential to be one of the world's best keepers.
Agree with you on that @Billy Biskix, just look at Pepe Reina's records for his first few seasons at Liverpool... His consistency over those first few years put him a class above the rest of the goalkeepers in the Premier League.

He joined Liverpool in July 2005 from Villarreal for £6million and set a number of club records tumbling in his first four seasons at Anfield. When he first arrived he was faced with the prospect of taking over Jerzy Dudeks position between the posts which wasn’t an easy task as Dudek had just become the hero of Istanbul.

Our sweeper keeper became an instant success in Merseyside. Pepe started his first season at Liverpool setting four new records earning himself the Barclays Golden Glove. During that 2005/06 season, Pepe conceded an average of only 0.575 goals per League game or 19 goals in 33 games. He set four new club records by keeping 11 consecutive clean sheets in a row, eight consecutive clean sheets in the Premier League and also kept 30 clean sheets in his first 50 Liverpool appearances surpassing Jerzy Dudek and Ray Clemence’s records.


The 2006/07 season saw him retain the Golden Glove award again with another impressive 19 clean sheets in 35 games.

2007/08 saw him complete a treble of Golden Glove awards. He featured in every league game for Liverpool that season which produced 19 clean sheets. In February 2008, our 3-0 win at Sunderland saw him complete his 50th clean sheet in the League in only his 92nd game, a record that again surpassed Ray Clemence’s previous club record.

Pepe finished the 2008/09 season with 20 clean sheets, equalling his best-ever tally since joining the club in 2005, although Edwin van der Sar would snatch the Golden Glove. During our 5-0 hammering of Aston Villa, Pepe, kept a 100th clean sheet for the Reds on his 197th appearance, again breaking Ray Clemence’s club record for a century of shut-outs by three games.

Pepe’s all round distribution was one of his great qualities which had proven invaluable to our attacking threat, he was always in complete control of his area and communicated brilliantly with the defence while his uncanny knack of saving penalties gave him the complete goalkeeper traits..

His position and willingness to move up away from his line had given Liverpool the licence to defend higher up the pitch. Such a shame how his Liverpool career ended....
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NZred

The Red From NZ
Joined
Jun 22, 2007
Messages
3,711
I've posted this before, but thought it might be a nice little read for some

My earliest memories of Liverpool the club probably date back to when I was about 5 or 6 (25 years ago) and my Granddad telling me all his stories about playing at Anfield, playing the NIgerian national team who had to wear boots and weren't used to it so they played the 2nd half bare foot. Dinners with Shankly, some of the innovative training methods that they introduced well before any other club. He always loved a yarn and I always loved to listen.

My first memory of actually full blooded support for the club is unfortunately not a happy one. The 1996 FA Cup Final. The build up, the pre match with THOSE suits, the era of the Spice Boys well and truly in the medias eye. Still remember putting my head and in hands and shaking my head after seeing Cantonas volley smacking into the back of the net....
 

ptt

2019, a year of incredible celebration
Joined
Oct 11, 2007
Messages
14,170
Here's a day i'll 'never' remember!! The day after Istanbul in 2005. The wonder, majesty, awe and downright drama of the events that unfolded left my friends and I in such a deep state of "liquid euphoria" that I have absolutely no memory of the following 24 hours.

Mrs PTT tells storys about me laughing raucously, describing every kick, tackle and decision in graphic detail interspersed with giggling stupidly to myself. I think it was captain marvel who caused these events to vanish from my grey matter. Whilst most consider his gesticulations after the header to be "Come on, come on my fellow players and fans" He was actually telling me personally to drink up. I decided that the more fluid I could drink, the better the chances that we'd win. I was psychically trying to osmose fluid into the players to keep them hydrated. A job that I must say I was fabulous at. So, which days have you been chemically incabable of comitting to memory and why?
 

Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
Joined
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Messages
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Some Memories Never Fade....


THE LEGEND OF HEROES

#13 - STEVE McMANAMAN



Shaggy hair, Jinxing runs, Magnificent goals
364 Liverpool Games... 66 Liverpool Goal....

How do you remember Steve McManaman in a Liverpool shirt?

Joined Liverpool at the age of 14 years, 364 games later, how do you remember Steve McManaman? What were his strengths/weaknesses? What are your best memories of him as a player? How will he be described in generations to come?

In detailed analysis, describe and let us know here how you will always remember Steve McManaman during his Liverpool career?

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Nick_LFC

Bob and Phil from Brazil!
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
4,658
The mazy, zig-zagging runs, complete freedom down the wing, sometimes overrunning the ball but always creative.

A real old-school winger, he still found his way to the middle often enough to change games with his goals. He had the ball on a string and still went at defenders quickly. His style epitomised the beautiful game for me, always forward with the ball, very few passes, unfortunately he occassionally lost the ball because of that.

I used to tape the odd game on VHS when I could at my grandparents' house and then go and do the same things on the playground and for the school team, the drop of the shoulder and eyes and then going the other way, he did it a lot more easily than I could, was my first favourite Liverpool player.

He didn't care about who a defender was or their reputation, he would just run at them for the entire game, he'd dribble for 90mins if he could do it without pissing off his teammates.

For me he's remembered as a quick, exciting optimistic player who, even with well over 300 games for us, still left us too soon. But his performances for us counter that dreadful white suit moment.
 

Zinedine Biscan

Half-man, half-Biscuit
Joined
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Messages
21,697
Will anyone ever forget THAT goal against Celtic... still to this day one of the best goals scored by any Liverpool player, and getting on for 20 years ago now.

The manner of his leaving probably means he'll not be remembered as fondly as some by many but in his time at the club he was probably my favourite player after Robbie... just loved watching him play.
 

Nick_LFC

Bob and Phil from Brazil!
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
4,658
Yeah I was devastated that he left us as I couldn't comprehend any club being ''better'' or bigger than Liverpool at the time, it just wasn't a reality in my mind.

I don't consider him similar to Owen in that regard but I don't know whether that makes me hypocritical. I guess you can't keep a player against his will and force them to sign, as we well know this window.

For us he was every bit as good as Figo, Zidane and Pires (for me the other world class dribblers of the time/near time) for their respective clubs at the time, God himself said that Stevie Mac was the best he's ever played with.
 

koptician

We'll go again!
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
2,777
Steve Macca, oh how I dreamt I could play like you!

I remember that mop of untamed bouncy hair...initially Macca relied a lot on his speed and that cracker of a right foot. One touch and he'd be away from his marker and impossible to collar. Best you could do is trail in his quicksilver wake. The Celtic goal is my favourite one, touching it around the first marker, going past one, nutmegging another and then the finish. His nutmegging was subtle, unexpected and effective. And his jinking, this way then the other and then either a burst of acceleration or the shot. Just magic. I seem to remember a lot of his runs were quite long ones, starting either on or behind the midfield line. Tremendous stamina to keep doing that, just naturally fit.
 

Libero

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2003
Messages
4,157
Asked to post this by @Broomy who wanted me to share a post I provided him a while back.

How I started supporting Liverpool?

I have often been asked this question or how I started supporting Liverpool to begin with and I have always found it difficult to answer.

Considering I have no family affiliation to Liverpool and grew up in Australia I have never really had an answer to why I started supporting Liverpool. My uncle who was a big inspiration as he played soccer and coached me was more of a Milan fan as in the 90s they had a few players from the Balkan region, Savicevic, Boban and he loved the Dutch Van Basten.

My earliest memory is that of Robbie Fowler's hat trick against Arsenal.

It came at a time when I first started playing soccer as it is called here and I was 9 years old. Back then we would get the premier league highlights show on weekends if I remember correctly on the ABC. I remember seeing it and just thinking was this even possible, the crowd was bathed in sunshine and it just all seemed surreal for a kid watching it on TV. The atmosphere was electric.

From then on it my education all things Liverpool was self-taught I read up on things were I could the internet started to evolve and I would just read up about Liverpool and their history and was immersed in it.

My family always had a strong love for football and my mum and uncle would then tell me stories about Liverpool in the 80s with Dalglish, Keegan and Craig Johnston who for Australians was an icon, so maybe deep down there was something binding me to Liverpool but I have always been one to think a club chooses you, you don't pick a club, in the same way you can't choose friends things just "click" I suppose.

My love for Liverpool has got my dad on side and it's definitely a family thing now. We all watch games together when we can and it's something that brings us together. (Edit: We just went to the Brisbane game together)

It's strange, I have always been a pessimist when it comes to religion, men of the cloth, etcetera but it was "god" who brought me to Liverpool Football Club.

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Clive

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2013
Messages
1,761
Re best individual performance, @Billy Biskix desribed Suarez's purple patch, however there was a time 5 or so years earlier when Torres was near unstoppable and bordering on cruel to opposition defences. For me this was epitomised by the Real match, I remember him jumping up and down behind Steve in the tunnel and how pumped up he was. Obviously for him being an Athletico ex player this was a huge game and among his best in a red shirt.

But most of all I remember the turn on Cannivaro and later goal from Dirk Kyut's cross, with the huge 'this is my name - Torres' celebration.

He was on fire then and I would give a lot for a no 9 like him again.

Watching back at this, it's evident how physical and combative he was then, something we really miss up front in recent times.

 
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LaurazRed

The hopeful one
Joined
Jan 5, 2015
Messages
1,095
Re best individual performance, @Billy Biskix desribed Suarez's purple patch, however there was a time 5 or so years earlier when Torres was near unstoppable and bordering on cruel to opposition defences. For me this was epitomised by the Real match, I remember him jumping up and down behind Steve in the tunnel and how pumped up he was. Obviously for him being an Athletico ex player this was a huge game and among his best in a red shirt.

But most of all I remember the turn on Cannivaro and later goal from Dirk Kyut's cross, with the huge 'this is my name - Torres' celebration.

He was on fire then and I would give a lot for a no 9 like him again.

Watching back at this, it's evident how physical and combative he was then, something we really miss up front in recent times.

I used to really enjoy watching Torres at his absolutely peak. Powerfully pacey with that coolness in front of goal.
My favourite goals were the ones against Blackburn, Marseille, and Arsenal in the Champions League.
 



Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
Joined
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Messages
1,472
#13 - Steve McManaman

Remember McManaman v Grobbellaar? It was Everton v Liverpool at Goodison, the Merseyside derby of September 1993.. It all started with Steve McManaman's poor clearance, Grobbelaar shouted at McManaman on the front post to get the ball away but instead of putting it into the stands he swung a left foot at it and it came back into the playing area – then Mark Ward scored on a half-volley. Grobbelaar wasn't too happy, McManaman argued back and Grobbelaar, well lets just saw Grobbelaar confronted him!! Classic Memories!! Liverpool went on to lose the match 2-0...

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kipland007

TIA Youth Team
Joined
Aug 17, 2008
Messages
978
I've seen some posts on how different people starting supporting Liverpool, so I thought I'd share a few moments from my experiences.

As an American, I didn't know anything about soccer/football until I started watching the World Cup in 2006. I quickly became obsessed and looked through all the EPL teams to decide which one I'd support. Somehow, I decided on Chelsea with Liverpool as a close second.

Through 2006-2007, I loosely followed the league and watched whatever Champions League matches on TV (those were easier to watch the EPL, from what I remember) I could find. The more I saw of Gerrard, the more he put me in awe. I began to dismiss Chelsea and start reading more about Liverpool. When the semi-final came around, I quickly realized just how despicable Chelsea were and how much I loved Liverpool. I don't remember much, but Agger's goal had me dancing around my house and the penalty shootout was one of the greatest moments I can remember. And Rafa sitting down while it happened? Fantastic. I was in. Despite being 17, I made plans to meet my Dad in at a bar in Boston for the Champions League Final. (Pretty sure it was on a Wednesday back then? Hard to believe how quickly things have changed.)

For the Final we went to a half Irish half Italian bar in the North End. Great atmosphere, only die hard fans (hard to find for big matches these days in the U.S.) and myself sitting at the bar while Scousers (native or adopted) downed beer after beer. We were the better team, but Pirlo's free kick (felt it was a handball) and Inzhaghi's second was so painful. I could barely speak on the way home. No one had ever seen me this devastated after a sporting event - and, to an extent, I didn't even realize how bad I felt until later.

I quickly started absorbing as much as I could. I went to college and converted all my friends into Liverpool fans (anyone who would listen to me, anyway). We'd sit around my laptop and 8 in the morning and watch streams of EPL games. The internet would be much faster before noon (everyone sleeping in on the weekends) so I'd hope that Liverpool played an early match and I could watch. Once everyone got online, the connected was far too slow for me to watch.

I arrived in Liverpool in the fall of 2009 for a semester abroad, convinced that we'd win the league. I had no idea how challenging it would be. I met a couple Norwegians who helped me get tickets - our home CL matches against Lyon and Fiorentina (both 2-1 losses). Something wasn't right with the club - it was hard to understand since I'd never even been in the city before, but I could tell that it wasn't the same as what I had read about and seen on TV. The team grew more and more frustrating to watch, but to this day I'm still angry that I didn't go to more matches.

Recently, my fiancee and I were in London to see us play West Ham at Upton Park in Spring of 2014. Probably the least interesting match to watch in that run (although it did have Andy Carroll punching Mignolet in the face) but the atmosphere was superb. I remember singing with the fans for at least 20 minutes after the match had ended, and truly believing we would win the league. Our flight home was scheduled right in the middle of the City match, and I could barely take it. No in-flight wifi, none of the flight staff knew anything about it, and I remember my hand shaking as I switched on my phone as soon as the wheels touched the ground. I had to re-read the score about 15 times before it actually clicked that we had won. Then, I saw the Henderson red card and thought "that will be trouble for us." My fiancee said I was being overly pessimistic and that I should enjoy the win. Who knows if it would have made the difference. Either way, I'd take that season 100 times over.
 

Herb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
5,861
On the topic of some of the greatest performances we've seen, I'd put forward one that maybe isn't up there in terms of a completely dominant performance over 90 minutes, but was just a sheer explosive ten minutes that won us a FA cup final in 2001 that in all honesty we had no right to win.

Arsenal had battered us for the entire game, should have had an absolute stonewall penalty which if seen would have been a red card for Henchoz and somehow couldn't get the ball over the line on about four occasions (I seem to remember Hyypia alone clearing off the line three times). As a youngster I still held some hope that after all that a sucker punch would surely come, but then Westerveld fluffed a clearance which led to him being rounded by Ljungberg who finally got the deserved goal. Even after that Arsenal should have sealed it, but Westerveld partially redeemed himself with an incredible save from a point blank range Henry effort.

Our equaliser was a bit scruffy, but Gary Mac who seemed to have a telling say in most of our good work in big games towards the end of that season put in a beauty of a delivery and Owen was razor sharp to pounce on the loose ball. I'd like to say I thought we'd be the only winners from there on in, but I distinctly remember calming down pretty quickly when giving a moments thought to how good that Arsenal side was, something in the back of my mind was just saying to win from the position we were in given how we had played would have been a miracle.

Owen's second against Arsenal still remains my favourite LFC goal. I idolised him above anybody else in our team at that point and that finish just solidified his status in my head. A very underrated goal considering the stage in the game, the occasion and the defence + keeper he was up against. The elation I felt in that moment sent me sprinting up the garden path. I loved both the celebration and the way the camera panned round right in front of our end, it was just brilliant in encapsulating an incredible moment.

I know a lot of our fans will never forgive Owen for playing for United, some feel a lot of hatred towards him. Most see him as a bit of a comedy figure now given he had a pretty disastrous end to his career on the bench at United and Stoke, and now he's making a pretty piss poor attempt at commentating. But I'll always look on him favourably for providing me with such a fantastic moment in my childhood.
 

Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
Joined
Jul 7, 2007
Messages
1,472
TIA Forum Member @Kopstar has kindly shared this article with us here in the Ee-Aye-Addio thread... The article was originally written for the Kevin Keegan v Luis Suarez thread in the Bootroom....


Amidst football's changing landscape...
Written by @Kopstar

On 1 December 1959 the club appointed Bill Shankly as manager. The club was in the second division and had been for four seasons, it had just been knocked out of the FA Cup by non-league Worcester City.

The average weekly wage (for a man) was £13.15 and the average house price was £2,500. A ticket to the FA Cup Final would have cost you about £3.50. There were no shirt sponsors, no stadium naming rights and the quickest way of communicating was by telegram.

So what of the football? 'Football is a simple game based on the giving and taking of passes, of controlling the ball and of making yourself available to receive a pass. It is terribly simple', Bill Shankly.

It's famous because it's a truism - it's incontestable. It speaks of the fundamentals of the game that are so often forgotten. When you strip the game back to its basics the above is exactly the best way of achieving the main objective, putting the ball in the opposition's net.

Shankly is espousing the idea of possession, one to be repeated by our present incumbent many years later, "If you are better than your opponent with the ball you have a 79% chance of winning the game".

But how exactly was this achieved under Shankly? At around the time he joined the club the traditional formation played by most English teams would look bizarre to most of us now; 2-3-5. The kop would regularly chant "attack, attack, attack" and it was common to find bruisers in the two full-back positions whose job was simply to get rid and/or play it long. Not exactly the template for possession centric, pass and move football. Nor was the fact that under Shankly Liverpool were one of the first exponents of the long throw-in, now utilised to some effect by Stoke.

By the late 60s Shankly had us playing what would be recognised as a 4-3-3 formation. However, 4-4-2 was also gaining wider use with Shankly deploying it in a European game against Anderlecht in 1964. The main break-through, however, was not the formation but the personnel.

In 1971 Shankly bought Kevin Keegan from Scunthorpe United for £35,000 that he later described as "robbery with violence". Keegan was our Suarez (though not quite as skilled). A menace, a constant thorn in the side of defenders, he was determined, he was a winner and he was a firebrand. It has been said that 'nobody could have ignited Liverpool's fire like Shankly and nobody could have fuelled it like Paisley'. Well, Keegan was the catalyst.

Liverpool hadn't won the title for 5 years (having won it in 64 and 66) but in Keegan and Toshack (bought the year before from Cardiff) they built a formidable goal-scoring partnership. With Steve Heighway and then Ray Kennedy and Jimmy Case, Liverpool were evolving into a team that carried huge attacking potential. Liverpool were not previously short of attacking legends, of course, with Hunt and St John only recently having left the club but the new team represented the true beginning of a footballing dynasty. Shankly now had the players.

In 1973, Shankly's Liverpool were beaten home and away by Red Star Belgrade. Shankly realised that his system needed innovation if we were ever to conquer Europe and he decided to move Emlyn Hughes from midfield to Centre Back where he would be partnered by Phil Thompson (who was effectively a midfielder in the reserves). Larry Lloyd was sold (who subsequently went on to win the European Cup twice with Nottingham Forest) and a new manner of playing was born.

1973 was actually the year in which we won both the League and the UEFA Cup. Not the most obvious time to totally reinvent the way we played football but that's exactly what Shankly did. In the next European game following the defeat to Red Star Belgrade the Thompson/Hughes partnership made its debut. That 11-0 win over Stromsgodset was the precursor to the domination that was to follow.

It was the legacy he left the club given that effectively his last game in charge was the 1974 FA Cup final win against Newcastle. Liverpool won with almost embarrassing ease prompting David Colemen to describe Newcastle's defence as having been "undressed".

It coincided with a revolution in Holland too. There, English centre halves were often the objects of ridicule but it was almost born of necessity that the Dutch created their famous side of 1974. When their key defenders (Hulshoff and Israel) were ruled out through injury they moved midfielders Haan and Rijsbergen to the centre of defence. Every outfield player was thus comfortable on the ball and they were able to build their attacks from the back. It required game intelligence and an awareness of your team-mates but players would pop up seemingly 'out of position' but it worked, a fluidity of football that mesmerised opponents as it did the rest of us.

It was made possible largely by the signing of Keegan who was initially bought to replace Ian Callaghan but whom showed promise up front in the pre-season friendlies of 71 and the deadly partnership with John Toshack was born. So Keegan was not only a principal factor in completing Shankly and Paisley's footballing vision of pass and move but he was also the catalyst for the most dominant period in the club's history. His legacy would be complete if his contribution was solely encapsulated with his playing career but the money generated by his sale was to prove, in my opinion, the single greatest impact in the fortunes of the club.

Enter messrs Dalglish and Hansen...

Written by @Kopstar (2013)