Ee-Aye-Addio

Broomy

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Think of all the Liverpool bookmarks in the story of your life as a football fan.
Flicking through them all, pick your favourite day, moment, match or player and share your story with us here in this thread ......



THE LEGEND OF HEROES

#13 - Jamie Redknapp



Jamie Redknapp - One of the most popular players to ever serve the club.

Redknapp made 308 appearances for Liverpool between 1991 and 2001 scoring 41 goals along the way.....

Despite being hampered by injury problems, How do you remember Jamie Redknapp in a Liverpool shirt? What match epitomized his grit and determination? What were his strengths/weaknesses? What are your best memories of him as a player? How will he be described in generations to come?

In detailed analysis, describe and let us know here how you will always remember Jamie Redknapp during his Liverpool career?

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LaurazRed

The hopeful one
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Mine is the wniner against Newcastle after yet another long injury lay off. The sheer joy on his face was clear to see. His passing and dead ball deliveries were overlooked in my opinion because of his injury problems.

Picking up the FA cup in 2001 as club captain after missing the entire season after being asked by Fowler and Hyypia was a great gesture.
 

Zinedine Biscan

Half-man, half-Biscuit
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The passage of time and an ageing brain mean I can't really recall specific incidents so much when it comes to Redknapp. What I mostly remember is the elegance, poise and creativity he brought to the team. Really, he was our Alonso a decade before we got Alonso, and if not for injuries you could have seen him making twice the number of appearances that he did - although 300+ isn't shabby by any means.

I just loved watching him play, it felt like he could drop the ball on a sixpence anywhere on the pitch, and alongside Fowler and McManaman he was one of my favourites on that Evans team that could have perhaps won a title were it not for defensive brittleness. If not for Alonso, he'd probably be remembered as one of, if not the, best passers of the ball to have played for Liverpool.
 

Billy Biskix

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Jamie was a good player. I wouldn't say he was one of the greats but he had a style and a swagger about his play that I liked. I associate him (unfairly) with some real low points in the times that I've followed Liverpool. I remember him scoring a great free kick (and then getting sent off) in a 5-1 defeat against Coventry under Souness, one of the lowest points ever for the club. Even the goal he scored in the YouTube compilation above against Nottingham Forest brings back bad memories. I was at that game. We drew 2-2 and I was disgusted with the lack of effort from a lot of the players. It was during the time that Houllier was trying to rid us of the 'Spice Boys' culture and not all of the players were on board with him. Stopped going to games for a long time after that.

Under Roy Evans he formed a central midfield partnership with John Barnes which definitely lacked a bit of bite but was easy on the eye. Not much tackling going on back then but I enjoyed watching us play. Houllier made him captain and his game went up a notch then. He had a great shot on him and was particularly good from set-pieces. Great vision too. His injuries held him back and I felt he never really fulfiiled his potential, much like a lot of the teams he played in. Above everything else he just always came across as a nice guy, which is pretty unusual for a professional footballer.
 

Zico Nealy

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Really liked Jamie Redknapp- lovely player.I remember him scoring from near the half-way against Vladikavkaz. Lovely deft first touch and excellent range of passing. Didn't have the grit and imposing physique of Gerrard or Souness but was an elegant midfielder
 

Billy Stevo's left boot

Born in L5, live in L4, support one L of a team
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TIA Forum Member @Kopstar has kindly shared this article with us here in the Ee-Aye-Addio thread... The article was originally written for the Kevin Keegan v Luis Suarez thread in the Bootroom....


Amidst football's changing landscape...
Written by @Kopstar

On 1 December 1959 the club appointed Bill Shankly as manager. The club was in the second division and had been for four seasons, it had just been knocked out of the FA Cup by non-league Worcester City.

The average weekly wage (for a man) was £13.15 and the average house price was £2,500. A ticket to the FA Cup Final would have cost you about £3.50. There were no shirt sponsors, no stadium naming rights and the quickest way of communicating was by telegram.

So what of the football? 'Football is a simple game based on the giving and taking of passes, of controlling the ball and of making yourself available to receive a pass. It is terribly simple', Bill Shankly.

It's famous because it's a truism - it's incontestable. It speaks of the fundamentals of the game that are so often forgotten. When you strip the game back to its basics the above is exactly the best way of achieving the main objective, putting the ball in the opposition's net.

Shankly is espousing the idea of possession, one to be repeated by our present incumbent many years later, "If you are better than your opponent with the ball you have a 79% chance of winning the game".

But how exactly was this achieved under Shankly? At around the time he joined the club the traditional formation played by most English teams would look bizarre to most of us now; 2-3-5. The kop would regularly chant "attack, attack, attack" and it was common to find bruisers in the two full-back positions whose job was simply to get rid and/or play it long. Not exactly the template for possession centric, pass and move football. Nor was the fact that under Shankly Liverpool were one of the first exponents of the long throw-in, now utilised to some effect by Stoke.

By the late 60s Shankly had us playing what would be recognised as a 4-3-3 formation. However, 4-4-2 was also gaining wider use with Shankly deploying it in a European game against Anderlecht in 1964. The main break-through, however, was not the formation but the personnel.

In 1971 Shankly bought Kevin Keegan from Scunthorpe United for £35,000 that he later described as "robbery with violence". Keegan was our Suarez (though not quite as skilled). A menace, a constant thorn in the side of defenders, he was determined, he was a winner and he was a firebrand. It has been said that 'nobody could have ignited Liverpool's fire like Shankly and nobody could have fuelled it like Paisley'. Well, Keegan was the catalyst.

Liverpool hadn't won the title for 5 years (having won it in 64 and 66) but in Keegan and Toshack (bought the year before from Cardiff) they built a formidable goal-scoring partnership. With Steve Heighway and then Ray Kennedy and Jimmy Case, Liverpool were evolving into a team that carried huge attacking potential. Liverpool were not previously short of attacking legends, of course, with Hunt and St John only recently having left the club but the new team represented the true beginning of a footballing dynasty. Shankly now had the players.

In 1973, Shankly's Liverpool were beaten home and away by Red Star Belgrade. Shankly realised that his system needed innovation if we were ever to conquer Europe and he decided to move Emlyn Hughes from midfield to Centre Back where he would be partnered by Phil Thompson (who was effectively a midfielder in the reserves). Larry Lloyd was sold (who subsequently went on to win the European Cup twice with Nottingham Forest) and a new manner of playing was born.

1973 was actually the year in which we won both the League and the UEFA Cup. Not the most obvious time to totally reinvent the way we played football but that's exactly what Shankly did. In the next European game following the defeat to Red Star Belgrade the Thompson/Hughes partnership made its debut. That 11-0 win over Stromsgodset was the precursor to the domination that was to follow.

It was the legacy he left the club given that effectively his last game in charge was the 1974 FA Cup final win against Newcastle. Liverpool won with almost embarrassing ease prompting David Colemen to describe Newcastle's defence as having been "undressed".

It coincided with a revolution in Holland too. There, English centre halves were often the objects of ridicule but it was almost born of necessity that the Dutch created their famous side of 1974. When their key defenders (Hulshoff and Israel) were ruled out through injury they moved midfielders Haan and Rijsbergen to the centre of defence. Every outfield player was thus comfortable on the ball and they were able to build their attacks from the back. It required game intelligence and an awareness of your team-mates but players would pop up seemingly 'out of position' but it worked, a fluidity of football that mesmerised opponents as it did the rest of us.

It was made possible largely by the signing of Keegan who was initially bought to replace Ian Callaghan but whom showed promise up front in the pre-season friendlies of 71 and the deadly partnership with John Toshack was born. So Keegan was not only a principal factor in completing Shankly and Paisley's footballing vision of pass and move but he was also the catalyst for the most dominant period in the club's history. His legacy would be complete if his contribution was solely encapsulated with his playing career but the money generated by his sale was to prove, in my opinion, the single greatest impact in the fortunes of the club.

Enter messrs Dalglish and Hansen...

Written by @Kopstar (2013)
Nice piece that, Keegan is so under rated by our fan base its untrue, I think a lot of fans actually credit Kenny for things that Kevin did. People often forget that Kenny joined a team that were the reigning English champions, European champions and a spawny Macari/Greenhoff goal away from winning THE treble back in the days when doubles happened twice a century.
Kevin Keegan didn't, he joined a club that was drifting, but when he left 6 years later he left a club that he had dragged to the summit of the game. The red number 7 shirt was already the most famous shirt in English football before Kenny even put it on.
 

Billy Stevo's left boot

Born in L5, live in L4, support one L of a team
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#My Complete Red Players

Which Liverpool players were best 'in your opinion' in each area of strength? Which player do you think of first when filling in the gaps??

Copy and paste the following into your reply and fill in the missing blanks....


The courage of _________
The strength of ________
The tackling ability of ________
The passing ability of ________
The pace of ________
The heading ability of ________
The Legend of ________
The passion of ________
The magic of ________
The dribbling of ________
The shooting of ________
The handling of ________
The presence of ________
The stamina of ________
The composure of ________
The power of ________
The versitility of ________
The technical ability of ________
The vision of ________
The inspiration of ________
The leadership of ________
The integrity of ________
The loyalty of ________
The awareness of ________
My Complete Red Players...
.
The courage of GERRY BYRNE
The strength of RON YEATS
The tackling ability of TOMMY SMITH / MARK LAWRENSON
The passing ability of XABI ALONSO
The pace of a young CALLY
The heading ability of TONY HATELEY
The legend of BILLY LIDDELL
The passion of EMLYN HUGHES
The magic of LUIS SUAREZ
The dribbling of PETER THOMPSON
The shooting of JIMMY CASE / BILLY LIDDELL
The handling of CLEMO
The presence of GRAEME SOUNESS
The stamina of TERRY MCDERMOTT
The composure of ALAN HANSEN
The power of BILLY LIDDELL
The versatility of BILLY LIDDELL (played in every position for us bar goalkeeper)
The technical ability of JOHN BARNES
The vision of KENNY DALGLISH
The inspiration of KEVIN KEEGAN / STEVEN GERRARD
The leadership of GRAEME SOUNESS / EMLYN HUGHES
The integrity of CALLY / BRIAN HALL
The loyalty of BILLY LIDDELL
The awareness of KENNY DALGLISH
My complete reds players
 

Zico Nealy

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Messages
387
Nice piece that, Keegan is so under rated by our fan base its untrue, I think a lot of fans actually credit Kenny for things that Kevin did. People often forget that Kenny joined a team that were the reigning English champions, European champions and a spawny Macari/Greenhoff goal away from winning THE treble back in the days when doubles happened twice a century.
Kevin Keegan didn't, he joined a club that was drifting, but when he left 6 years later he left a club that he had dragged to the summit of the game. The red number 7 shirt was already the most famous shirt in English football before Kenny even put it on.
This is sooo true. I was only 11 when he left but I remember his final season very well and `Keegan was an amazing player. He had a bit of Suarez about him- not as tricky but combative and unpredictable. He was a leader too. I get the impression a lot of Reds felt a bit betrayed by his decision to leave us, and I was there when his Hamburg came back a year later and got drilled 6-0. He took some stick for that. that and his love for being an England player. the guy was class though and you can tell he loves this club more than almost any ex player. Top top man, total respect for Mighty Mouse, the first legend Red 7
 

lfc.eddie

"¿Plata... O Plomo?"
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Well, I'm way, way too young to even know football at that time. Could kick the ball and that's about it when Keegan left the club. He left in 77 and I was too bloody young to remember till I caught up about him. Thanks to my oldman again who introduced football to me, telling me about him. Not until I went back with my oldman to visit my granny in Malaysia 7 years later when I have a bit more football knowledge and saw the man playing for Malaysian Youth team as guest-star. That's as far as I can remember about Keegan. So I don't think Keegan was underrated, those who rated him are a bit in the older generation and hardly in internet forum.
 

Billy Biskix

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I think the reason why Keegan is 'under-rated' or, more accurately, not loved by the fan base as much as others is that he is probably seen as someone who was personally ambitious, rather than someone who had a great affinity with the club. A bit like Owen in that respect. It seems bizarre that Keegan left us for Hamburg and he was a bigger hero at Newcastle than he was at Liverpool.

He was a great player. I'd compare him to Suarez in that he was small but tough. Very skilful and quick. A hard bastard who you wouldn't want to mess with. A workaholic on the pitch. Great finisher and amazingly good in the air for a wee lad. His partnership with Toshack is legendary. He was my hero when I was growing up. I remember making him (yes, making him) a birthday card and sending it off to him c/o Anfield Road L4. I never got a reply.

When he left for Hamburg it was a lesson learned as he made me realise that the players didn't feel the same way about Liverpool as I did. Until then I hadn't even thought there might be clubs that our players might want to play for rather than us. There were only players that weren't good enough for Liverpool any more and needed to be sold to make room for players who were. I loved it (loved it!) when we beat Hamburg 6-0 the next season and Keegan was humiliated in front of the Kop. By then we had Kenny who was an upgrade in every respect as a player and the fact that his replacement became such a legend is probably another reason why Keegan is probably not as highly regarded as he should be.
 

cardiffpete

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Ee-Aye-Addio

what does this mean in englisgh???
It's the name of a BBC documentary, chronicling LFC's search for our first ever FA Cup win in 1965 under Shanks and over Chelsea then (in the Semi's) and then eventually winning it versus Leeds (2-1).

It was the beginning of LFC's colossal and unstoppable march to unsurpassed glory in the next 2 1/2 decades. Just a small taste of the unrelenting glory that was then to come, season after season. LFC on the march to becoming the most successful side in Global football and unrelenting success-after-success.

Culminating in 10 or even 11 world-class players playing within a single team, of sustained brilliance. Never to be repeated stuff and LFC's (nostalgic) legacy to World football.

Sadly no longer evident, but your cure for the LFC blues of late is to just stick on a DVD of Paisley, Fagan, Kenny mark #1 or even Rafa ...and to re-watch a team that just about had no equals in Football ...once upon a time (and really not too long ago either, or it doesn't seem like it to me).

Ee-Aye-Addio!
 

Billy Biskix

TIA Youth Team
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'Ee-Aye-Addio' meant that we'd won something. You can hear it here at 1.10 as we celebrate winning the title in 1973. I love this video particularly the closing scenes with Shankly and the Kop. What an incredible man. I doubt we'll ever see a manager/supporter relationship like this ever again.

 

Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
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Some Memories Never Fade ......



THE LEGEND OF HEROES

#14 - EMILE HESKEY



Emile Heskey - 223 appearances for Liverpool between 2000 and 2004 scoring 60 goals along the way.....

"He’s a diamond of a player, he embodies all the right qualities of a professional footballer," Houllier said. "He’s very hard-working, sacrifices himself for the team. He’s always decisive because he’s so strong."

How do you remember Emile Heskey in a Liverpool shirt? What matches epitomized his grit and determination? What were his strengths/weaknesses? What are your best memories of him as a player? How will he be described in generations to come?

In detailed analysis, describe and let us know here how you will always remember Emile Heskey during his Liverpool career?

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Billy Biskix

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Heskey frustrated the hell out of me. In his first game for us against Sunderland he won a penalty almost immediately, using all his power and pace to burst into the area before being brought down. I really thought we had a potential world class player on our hands who, on his day, was going to be completely unstoppable. It never really happened though. I remember those long, long goal droughts and those performances where he just faded out of games. I always thought he had a lack of confidence and belief in his own ability and that was what held him back.

At the same time he did well for the most part under Houllier. Once we went long ball Heskey became the perfect partner for Owen. They became a Toshack/Keegan for the 21st century although they never had quite the same impact. Heskey's greatest goal and one of his best ever performances was against Roma in the CL in 2002. It was Gerard's first game back after his heart scare. Anfield was bouncing that night. One of our greatest European games. Heskey was magnificent. This was one game where he really was unstoppable. He scored a towering header and ran Roma ragged all night. It was a brilliant performance,. Just a shame that we didn't see it more often.
 
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jaffod

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How is Heskey a hero? He was a very average forward for Liverpool.

I suppose it's all subjective, after all someone described Jamie Redknapp as 'our Alonso, a decade before we got Alonso'. I think Billy's post on Heskey sums him up quite well.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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Gentle giant, was Heskey. Had the frame and athleticism that could have made him an unstoppable force, but he was just too nice to really make his natural attributes count. He had one decent season for us when it seemed to come together in terms of goals, but he was probably most effective as a foil for Owen, both at club and international level. As a player for Liverpool, though, when I think of Heskey I feel frustration that he could have been so much more with just a tad more ruthlessness.
 

Billy Biskix

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Some unashamed nostalgia here. I have high hopes of Klopp restoring some of our reputation in Europe over the next few years. Brief highlights of the match that kick-started the legend of the great European nights at Anfield, possibly the most iconic game in LFC history.

Few things that struck me. Clemence wearing a yellow jersey and being brilliant, toilet roll all over the place and a St Etienne player actually trying to kick through it when he takes a corner, Toshack looking unbelievably slow on the ball, Bathenay's cool celebration when he scores and 'Fairclough is onside...' and the roar that greets that goal.

"
 

Broomy

TIA's Redkopi
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THE LEGEND OF HEROES

Some fantastic stories and memories in this thread so far, lets get a few more memories and tales here, if there's any new members here who hasn't contributed yet, think of all the Liverpool bookmarks in the story of your life as a football fan. Flicking through them all, pick your favourite day, moment, match or player and share your story with us here in this thread ...... Over the coming days make sure and contribute to the thread with your own personal memories and stories from following Liverpool down through the years....


 

104TOSH

mystic, clown and philosopher
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I have been a Liverpool supporter for 45 years, and have plenty of great memories. I was lucky to go to the away leg against a fine footballing side, Borussia Monchengladbach in the 1972-73 UEFA Cup Final. We went with a 3-0 first leg win, and boy did we get a battering going in 2-0 down at half time ! My brother spent the 2nd half unable to watch and for 45 minutes he prayed to God for a miracle, The 2nd half was seen through and I remember Emlyn Hughes hitting the crossbar with a long range effort. It was a truly joyous occasion, and I was blessed to see Bill Shankly walking through the airport with Kevin Keegan - I was unable to speak because to me Shankly was God ! I was consistently sent out of Religious Education for arguing with the teacher about Shanks being God !!!

My hero was John Toshack, obviously ! Steve Heighway came a close second and Alec Lindsay was third. I have seen so many great Liverpool players - Callaghan, Tommy Smith, Larry Lloyd, Kevin Keegan, Alan Hansen, Mark Lawrenson, Craig Johnstone, Phil Neal, Bruce Grobbelar, and the list goes on.

Great memories !

 

Seen it all

A Realist is a Pessimist with Experiance!
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Some unashamed nostalgia here. I have high hopes of Klopp restoring some of our reputation in Europe over the next few years. Brief highlights of the match that kick-started the legend of the great European nights at Anfield, possibly the most iconic game in LFC history.

Few things that struck me. Clemence wearing a yellow jersey and being brilliant, toilet roll all over the place and a St Etienne player actually trying to kick through it when he takes a corner, Toshack looking unbelievably slow on the ball, Bathenay's cool celebration when he scores and 'Fairclough is onside...' and the roar that greets that goal.

"​
Loved this The thing that struck me is the commentator sounds just like Eric Idle. lol
 

Broomy

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How is Heskey a hero? He was a very average forward for Liverpool.
Haha, I have to say Emile Heskey was my hero, my hero "just" for one day...

It was the night we were in Monaco’s Stade Louis II in 2001, the UEFA Cup-holders Liverpool played Champions League winners Bayern Munich in the European Super Cup. It was the night Liverpool went on to make history that night becoming the first English club to lift five trophies in a calendar year when they beat Bayern Munich 3-2 to claim the 2001 Super Cup in Monaco.

I'll always remember Liverpool's second goal of the night, it was scored just before the half time whistle when Dietmar Hamann sent a cleverly timed through ball through to Emile Heskey who calmly lifted the ball over Kahn and into the net!


With all his frustrations, it's worth remembering Emile Heskey ended the 00/01 season with 22 goals from 56 appearances for Liverpool!!
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Billy Biskix

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Haha, I have to say Emile Heskey was my hero, my hero "just" for one day...

It was the night we were in Monaco’s Stade Louis II in 2001, the UEFA Cup-holders Liverpool played Champions League winners Bayern Munich in the European Super Cup. It was the night Liverpool went on to make history that night becoming the first English club to lift five trophies in a calendar year when they beat Bayern Munich 3-2 to claim the 2001 Super Cup in Monaco.

I'll always remember Liverpool's second goal of the night, it was scored just before the half time whistle when Dietmar Hamann sent a cleverly timed through ball through to Emile Heskey who calmly lifted the ball over Kahn and into the net!

With all his frustrations, it's worth remembering Emile Heskey ended the 00/01 season with 22 goals from 56 appearances for Liverpool!!
..
Thanks for posting, Broomy. I have literally no recollection of this game at all and couldn't remember having seen any of the goals before. Good to see Riise sliding in the first there and Heskey took his goal brilliantly. This was also round about the time when Owen discovered that he was allowed to kick the ball with his left foot.

Heskey was such a frustrating player because he had all the attributes you'd associate with a top quality striker. Not a 'hero' as such but then few players are. More a good player who didn't quite fulfill his potential.
 



Billy Biskix

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Yesterday's game reminded me of this one from 36 years ago. A 5-3 away win with some late drama. Highlights below. Some things to look out for are a rare start and hat-trick for 'Super-Sub' David Fairclough, some dodgy defending from us at set-pieces (not everything has changed in 36 years), Jocky Hansen running the length of the field for the second and a brilliantly taken Norwich goal scored by the late Justin Fashanu.

 

Billy Biskix

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Wasn't the Fashanu one goal of the season?
Yes it was. Scored when he was still only 18 years old.

That Hansen's run is a beauty, imagine Sakho did that now, we all be shitting bricks.
Yes, for all the talk about the importance of having a ball-playing CB you just don't see those sort of runs from a CB any more. Hansen did it all the time. Here's another example which is worth posting in this thread because I reckon it results in the worse miss by a Liverpool player ever. Stand down, Ronnie Rosenthal and arise Sir Kenneth Mathieson Dalglish.