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Jürgen Klopp: 2018 - 2019

igor_piss_can

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I was looking at Jürgen's interview the very first day he was unveiled as the new manager. He looked so smart, fresh faced, healthy and Adonis godlike. When I saw him after the Champions league final, he looked kind of tired and his beard has gone more grey, he had more wrinkles and he looked battled hardened from a tour of duty from Iraq or Afghanistan , he has aged abit as well.

It is impossible to do a Fergie or Wenger in modern football and stay 20 years at one club,especially in the 5 main competitive European Leagues. Even if Gerarrd comes to LFC, he won't be able to stay that long either.
Yep he looks like he's aged at least 10 years since 2015 (apart from the teeth!)
 


redfanman

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He'll stay as long as we are competitive as a football club . He left dortmund because they kept selling / allowing his best players to leave and making bayern stronger . They were really struggling the season he decided it was time to go and it's taken them 4 years to build a new squad capable of competing for the title .
I dont think it is about competitiveness. I think he just may need a break as he puts so much of himself into his work, or his family may simply wish to return to Germany.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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Klopp puts so much energy and passion into managing that I think he will burn out, and when he says he will see out his contract and after that he's not sure - or even retire, as this latest article suggests - I'm inclined to take him at face value. He's an honest guy, and says what he's feeling. After a time it becomes a matter of health, and I think he's likely to put that first if it comes to it.
 



lfc.eddie

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I Just hope that FSG have an idea and are planning succession after Klopp .
They need to go for the same standard .means no unproven manager , be it an outsider or an ex player
We should aim for the like of Pep , Pochettino or Simeone
Let's enjoy it while it last. The names you put out don't come close to what Klopp as a man is, not even an ounce. So we are not going to find this gem of a man anymore after he leaves, so let's just enjoy his work while we all still can. Some like @Commando is resigned to the fact that the manager will leave, I have come to terms and resigned to the fact that this isn't my club anymore. I am just one of the customers who is crazy over the product the owners is selling.

Klopp puts so much energy and passion into managing that I think he will burn out
I think everyone only sees the footballing side of things and named managers that could take the job, and forgot the human side of things. Klopp is special. I am a big fan of Rafa Benitez because of his attention to detail, also his live and die football attitude. Klopp is not like that, the reason why I am so drawn to this man and would defend him to the hilt is because of the off the pitch side. The way he understands people, understands the club, bringing people together and making the club filled with smiling faces. From the terrace to the pitch, to the tunnel, cafeteria and all over, he just brought everyone moving and pushing towards the same direction.

What he does as the leader of the club, yes the club (playing and non-playing staff alike), is not an easy feat and something I would love to be able to mimic as a business owner. His character, his way, made everyone wants to come to work. Not many people I've met that has that pull factor or seen in my whole life in various industries that is that charismatic. Mourinho can keep claiming he's the special one and all that..... to me, Klopp is Special!
 
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fspencer

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I dont think it is about competitiveness. I think he just may need a break as he puts so much of himself into his work, or his family may simply wish to return to Germany.
It is about competing . Look at him on the touchline even in a friendly . He is driven by a competitive streak. He may one day manage the german national team but he is happy here as are his family .

If we started to sell his best players and not replacing them with equal or better then he will decide it's not worth all the aggravation for little reward . IF you're one of the best at your job then you don't wish to be hampered by having to use inferior equipment .

when things are going great and everyone is working towards the same goals then you don't feel as exhausted .

I think with dortmund it wasn't fun anymore and he did feel exhausted because he was putting in the same effort and they were struggling . They replaced lewandowski with immobile ? if i remember right and that didn't work out at all.

was a bit like replacing suarez with balotelli.

i do get your point on exhaustion and needing a break but i think it only happens to have a major effect if not competing .
 

Red_Jedi

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Klopp puts so much energy and passion into managing that I think he will burn out, and when he says he will see out his contract and after that he's not sure - or even retire, as this latest article suggests - I'm inclined to take him at face value. He's an honest guy, and says what he's feeling. After a time it becomes a matter of health, and I think he's likely to put that first if it comes to it.
At some point Klopp has to leave. But one thing that I really don't understand is why clubs don't openly succession plan. So when Klopp decides to go, can he not say that this is my last season - then an assistant (like Pep Linders) is groomed, or someone else is brought in to prepare in that last season. Klopp may go and along with him Peter Krawitc, but the rest of the coaching team stays - including Edwards, and the transition for a new manager is not so abrupt.

Barca did that when Pep Guardiola took over. And they have recruited from within plenty recently. This is the way I'd like to see our club do -but otherwise have a plan.

Meanwhile, lets juice every minute of this while we can.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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At some point Klopp has to leave. But one thing that I really don't understand is why clubs don't openly succession plan. So when Klopp decides to go, can he not say that this is my last season - then an assistant (like Pep Linders) is groomed, or someone else is brought in to prepare in that last season. Klopp may go and along with him Peter Krawitc, but the rest of the coaching team stays - including Edwards, and the transition for a new manager is not so abrupt.

Barca did that when Pep Guardiola took over. And they have recruited from within plenty recently. This is the way I'd like to see our club do -but otherwise have a plan.

Meanwhile, lets juice every minute of this while we can.
I've felt for a little while like Ljinders is being groomed, perhaps for such a succession in mind - he's a Klopp acolyte so in that sense it would be a relatively smooth transition. It would be a ballsy move though considering his lack of experience. But I would like to see us go down a Boot Room style succession plan, or more recently similar to what Barca does, rather than appoint a flavour of the month manager who'll tear up the blueprint and do things his own way (which could go well but equally could go badly!).
 

lfc.eddie

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Barca did that when Pep Guardiola took over. And they have recruited from within plenty recently. This is the way I'd like to see our club do -but otherwise have a plan.
Txiki Begiristain masterminded that move, so it is down to the director of football to do that plan. The problem here is that our manager's personality is larger than life and Ljinders tried too hard to be like him. Mannerism to talking about football and all that, he tried too damn hard. Just take a look at our transition during the 60s to the 80s. All our managers have different personalities, Shankly to Paisley to Fagan to Kenny and so on. Method stays the same, but characteristics are different. I have friends in Holland that told me this Ljinders came across as a bit know-it-all type of figure and didn't exactly delivers during his tenure. If he did, we wouldn't be able to get him back to our club. So jury is definitely out with this fella.

Like I said in my previous posts. I am going to enjoy the football till Klopp leaves. Then whatever happens, happens. He is definitely irreplaceable and we as fans won't have that same bond with the club as we do right now with him at the helm. We lost it for awhile in the late 90s and till Rodgers days. Rafa did try to unite us with football which I certainly appreciate, but this guy is really something else. So as a customer to the club, all I can do is enjoy this current product offering until it expires (I never used to feel like this till the cowboys strolled in).
 



redfanman

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At some point Klopp has to leave. But one thing that I really don't understand is why clubs don't openly succession plan. So when Klopp decides to go, can he not say that this is my last season - then an assistant (like Pep Linders) is groomed, or someone else is brought in to prepare in that last season. Klopp may go and along with him Peter Krawitc, but the rest of the coaching team stays - including Edwards, and the transition for a new manager is not so abrupt.

Barca did that when Pep Guardiola took over. And they have recruited from within plenty recently. This is the way I'd like to see our club do -but otherwise have a plan.

Meanwhile, lets juice every minute of this while we can.
For the same reason its difficult to recruit top level players to come in as cover....those with aspirations to manage with talent get sought out by other clubs to manage and not just coach or deputise.

Clubs also dont usually know exactly when a manager will step down (i guess most get sacked) so it is hard to plan for. Klopp leaving after this contract is probably a rare exception (Pepe at City another) as to being able to determine timing.

If someone from the boot room does come in to replace the manager and does badly, then they usually get sacked and the club either has to try another in house promotion or from outside. If the former then at some point the well runs dry from who they can promote.

We are lucky that our boot room was made up of people who were capable and talented coaches who showed they could also manage. It's very rare that you could get so many people together at once like that.
 



Hope in your heart

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I was looking at Jürgen's interview the very first day he was unveiled as the new manager. He looked so smart, fresh faced, healthy and Adonis godlike. When I saw him after the Champions league final, he looked kind of tired and his beard has gone more grey, he had more wrinkles and he looked battled hardened from a tour of duty from Iraq or Afghanistan than major European Cup final, he has aged abit as well.

It is impossible to do a Fergie or Wenger in modern football and stay 20 years at one club, especially in the 5 main competitive European Leagues. It has taken its toll on many managers. Health and well being is more important. Even if Gerarrd comes to LFC, he won't be able to stay that long either.
I'm not sure about that to be honest. Look at any man going from 48 to 52 years old: it's usually the years where someone goes from being a young man to a not-so-young man... ;-) I'm not sure that it has to do something with the pressure of being Liverpool manager. And if you look at a guy like Ancelotti, he is still managing a club at 60, and doesn't look like he'll stop soon.

I also don't believe that it isn't possible anymore to do a Wenger or a Ferguson. Both retired a few years ago only, and it was age catching up with them, rather than the exceeding pressure which got the better out of them in the end. Both of them lived through the change towards the current circus football has become, and both managed to adapt very well.

In my opinion, lack of longevity in current football has much more to do with impatient owners and fans who think that the grass is greener elsewhere and want to chop and change whenever results dovetail a bit. fsg however are the patient kind of owners and tend to look at the long term. They know that with Klopp, they have a genuine world-class coach on their hands. His ultra-consistent approach to his work and the recent success has bought him a lot of time, just like at Dortmund. No reasonable owner would sack him on short notice, so he has very much something in him which you can compare with Wenger or Ferguson.

At the end of the day, for a manager who is well-settled into a club and can distribute the work at hand among people he's able to trust, pressure will be considerably lesser than if he must start at a new job and a new city or even country every three-four years to reconstruct a club which has problems. With Klopp's patient long-term approach, and with the way he's able to keep the players and everyone at the club behind him and build his squad piece by piece, pressure would tend to become rather less than more, especially as his working method tends to end up with a high-level consistency in terms of performances and results.

So, I for one don't think that it is the pressure which will decide Kloppo's longevity at LFC. It will be Jürgen himself. But where would he go from here? To Madrid or Barca who chop and change their head coach every two years? To Bayern, who have the same tendency? Back to Dortmund? Can't see it myself.

He'll maybe want to manage the German national team at some point, but it could also well be that he'll never manage a national team anyway, as what he loves most is to work on a daily basis with the players. That's where he is most effective, and he wouldn't have that with a national team.

Also, I'm quite sure that Klopp is the kind of guy who will never be able to stay far away from a football pitch. He needs the energy and adrenalin which comes with the job. He needs the passion coming from the fans, and to be able to share it with them. Can you see him retiring in two years, and from then on living a quiet life as a pensioner for the next thirty years? Never, he needs football to be alive, and that's why he'll probably, health permitting, become one of the longest-serving managers in the game.

But again, where to go for him after Liverpool? For me, it's quite simple: the encounter between Klopp and LFC is a match made in heaven. Why break up a match made in heaven? It makes no sense, he's here to stay. :wave:
 

eng.amohd

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I think everyone only sees the footballing side of things and named managers that could take the job, and forgot the human side of things. Klopp is special. I am a big fan of Rafa Benitez because of his attention to detail, also his live and die football attitude. Klopp is not like that, the reason why I am so drawn to this man and would defend him to the hilt is because of the off the pitch side. The way he understands people, understands the club, bringing people together and making the club filled with smiling faces. From the terrace to the pitch, to the tunnel, cafeteria and all over, he just brought everyone moving and pushing towards the same direction.
Hats off to you Sir, not many people see this side of Klopp. For me, Klopp is signifying all the positive traits that should be in a football manager, attractive yet effective football, charisma, motivator, club leader plus the obvious tactical acumen. I really hope he retires with us, and hold a senior role in the club afterwards.
 

Red_Jedi

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I'm not sure about that to be honest. Look at any man going from 48 to 52 years old: it's usually the years where someone goes from being a young man to a not-so-young man... I'm not sure that it has to do something with the pressure of being Liverpool manager. And if you look at a guy like Ancelotti, he is still managing a club at 60, and doesn't look like he'll stop soon.

I also don't believe that it isn't possible anymore to do a Wenger or a Ferguson. Both retired a few years ago only, and it was age catching up with them, rather than the exceeding pressure which got the better out of them in the end. Both of them lived through the change towards the current circus football has become, and both managed to adapt very well.

In my opinion, lack of longevity in current football has much more to do with impatient owners and fans who think that the grass is greener elsewhere and want to chop and change whenever results dovetail a bit. fsg however are the patient kind of owners andf tend to look at the long term. They know that with Klopp, they have a genuine world-class coach on their hands. His ultra-consistent approach to his work and the recent success has bought him a lot of time, just like at Dortmund. No reasonable owner would sack him on short notice, so he has very much something in him which you can compare with Wenger or Ferguson.

At the end of the day, for a manager who is well-settled into a club and can distribute the work at hand among people he's able to trust, pressure will be considerably lesser than if he must start at a new job and a new city or even country every three-four years to reconstruct a club which has problems. With Klopp's patient long-term approach, and with the way he's able to keep the players and everyone at the club behind him and build his squad piece by piece, pressure would tend to become rather less than more, especially as his working method tends to end up with a high-level consistency in terms of performances and results.

So, I for one don't think that it is the pressure which will decide Kloppo's longevity at LFC. It will be Jürgen himself. But where would he go from here? To Madrid or Barca who chop and change their head coach every two years? To Bayern, who have the same tendency? Back to Dortmund? Can't see it myself.

He'll maybe want to manage the German national team at some point, but it could also well be that he'll never manage a national team anyway, as what he loves most is to work on a daily basis with the players. That's where he is most effective, and he wouldn't have that with a national team.

Also, I'm quite sure that Klopp is the kind of guy who will never be able to stay far away from a football pitch. He needs the energy and adrenalin which comes with the job. He needs the passion coming from the fans, and to be able to share it with them. Can you see him retiring in two years, and from then on living a quiet life as a pensioner for the next thirty years? Never, he needs football to be alive, and that's why he'll probably, health permitting, become one of the longest-serving managers in the game.

But again, where to go for him after Liverpool? For me, it's quite simple: the encounter between Klopp and LFC is a match made in heaven. Why break up a match made in heaven? It makes no sense, he's here to stay.
Can I designate you as Klopp's agent please. I do hope what you say is true.
 

Maria

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Aww, @Hope in your heart @lfc.eddie I feel much better now.

One thing I will look forward to before I lose my marbles is reading the next chapter of Jürgen adventure, a biography called " Liverpool years". I am sure there will be some riveting and funny anecdotes and European shenanigans we will hear about on and of the pitch at Melwood after he is back in Germany.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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Can I designate you as Klopp's agent please. I do hope what you say is true.
I do, too, but Klopp himself has been dropping hints for a while now that he sees the end of this contract (2022) as a natural conclusion, and has also promised his family he'll be taking a year out from the game at some point, so clearly the concern about exhaustion and/or burn-out is playing on his mind to some extent.
 



igor_piss_can

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I do, too, but Klopp himself has been dropping hints for a while now that he sees the end of this contract (2022) as a natural conclusion, and has also promised his family he'll be taking a year out from the game at some point, so clearly the concern about exhaustion and/or burn-out is playing on his mind to some extent.
You'd think that the club would have also tabled a deal by now after the European Cup victory & our highest ever points tally. Granted he's still got 3 years left but you'd imagine even a 1 year extension on improved terms would make complete sense. I think word at the top is that he's set on taking a break post 2022 which is why they haven't put anything on the table
 

Dutch

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IF Klopp retires at the end of 2022 I will thank him for his service and the job he did but it will not the end of LFC. By than Stevie G. has made all the rookie mistakes he could make at Rangers and I will be perfectly fine giving his a shot.
 

redfanman

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I do, too, but Klopp himself has been dropping hints for a while now that he sees the end of this contract (2022) as a natural conclusion, and has also promised his family he'll be taking a year out from the game at some point, so clearly the concern about exhaustion and/or burn-out is playing on his mind to some extent.
I think he has also expressed an interest in going back into the Studio to talk about football.
 



MinniMo

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Did Klopp actually get a break this summer, at all?

Maybe we, as a club should stop having so many Pre-Season matches and ensure that every player and our manager get a decent time off to recover and unwind. I wouldn't consider looking at a job which didn't give me at least 4 weeks break a year - and if it was as high impact a job as our lads have, I would be looking for 6 weeks. I know they get paid massive amounts to do this, but bodies and minds can only take so much.

It was one thing that horrified Klopp when he came to us, that the EPL doesn't do winter breaks, I think he'd sort of factored those into the job.
 

Abdel

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IF Klopp retires at the end of 2022 I will thank him for his service and the job he did but it will not the end of LFC. By than Stevie G. has made all the rookie mistakes he could make at Rangers and I will be perfectly fine giving his a shot.
That's exactly what we should not do . going full romantic by doing a Utd .
Didn't work well for us in a recent past . why we should take that risk again ?
 

Hope in your heart

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I do, too, but Klopp himself has been dropping hints for a while now that he sees the end of this contract (2022) as a natural conclusion, and has also promised his family he'll be taking a year out from the game at some point, so clearly the concern about exhaustion and/or burn-out is playing on his mind to some extent.
Yeah, he's someone who puts human needs and wishes at a high place. So, his wife and family has to enter the equation of course. I don't remember if it's you or someone else here who suggested this already, but if he needs a year off, I dearly hope that the club will offer him to take it, manage the period in-between with a stand-in manager (ie. Lijnders), and then welcome him back when he's fit and raring to go again.

Basically, any idea to hold him to the club long-term which would allow him to recharge batteries should be explored, with him and his family.
 

igor_piss_can

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I wouldn't take Gerrard either, definitely not in the next 3 years. As great a player he was he shown on a few occasions that he was prone to letting his heart overrule his head. Unless something sensational happens I don't think he'll have the experience either, a few years playing second fiddle in the SPL isn't the apprenticeship you need to manage one of the biggest clubs in the world. Legend or not
 

Zinedine Biscan

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Yeah, he's someone who puts human needs and wishes at a high place. So, his wife and family has to enter the equation of course. I don't remember if it's you or someone else here who suggested this already, but if he needs a year off, I dearly hope that the club will offer him to take it, manage the period in-between with a stand-in manager (ie. Lijnders), and then welcome him back when he's fit and raring to go again.

Basically, any idea to hold him to the club long-term which would allow him to recharge batteries should be explored, with him and his family.
Yeah, that was my suggestion a while back for if the need should arise. I'd hate to lose someone of Klopp's calibre just because he needed a break to recharge his batteries at some point.