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Jürgen Klopp: 2018 - 2019

lfc.eddie

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IF Klopp retires at the end of 2022 I will thank him for his service and the job he did but it will not the end of LFC. By than Stevie G. has made all the rookie mistakes he could make at Rangers and I will be perfectly fine giving his a shot.
Sentimental appointment will not be the best thing for a club. Unless all of a sudden Gerrard won the Champs League 3 times in a row convincingly with under valued club by then. I still don’t rate him that highly, not yet.
 


Hope in your heart

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Yeah, that was my suggestion a while back for if the need should arise. I'd hate to lose someone of Klopp's calibre just because he needed a break to recharge his batteries at some point.
The club made that error with Dalglish after his first stint and the exhausting additional charge of having to manage the post-Hillsborough trauma. They let him go and replaced him with someone less competent instead of letting him recharge his batteries and taking him back after a while. So hopefully that lesson will be remembered when and if needed.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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The club made that error with Dalglish after his first stint and the exhausting additional charge of having to manage the post-Hillsborough trauma. They let him go and replaced him with someone less competent instead of letting him recharge his batteries and taking him back after a while. So hopefully that lesson will be remembered when and if needed.
Yep, it was exactly that situation with Kenny that made me hope that things would be managed differently now should a similar situation arise.
 

Cologne-Liverpool

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For the time being, I'd take Klopp by his word. Apart from that it's all speculation obviously. Personally could see him extending his contract for example if he hasn't won the league by then, but thinks he might have a realistic chance with 1 or 2 seasons more. But who knows, 3 years is like an eternity in football nowadays
 

Zoran

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There will be life after Klopp, providing the structure that remains in place (if it's the same people doing the same good job when that happens) makes a good decision and we keep growing the club as much as possible under these owners. Fan fear is absolutely understandable. He's been really our main player of all club structures (no matter of FSG finally finding their way how to run this), in the last few years, from top to bottom. Plus, it would be a bit weird (in a positive way) if we can appoint two quality managers in a row (that final bit is often the problem with us, consistency in being competitive/winning). For me, I'm not yet thinking about it. We should better all accept that it's almost impossible to find another Klopp, that blend between football style, personality and loyalty (willing to be here and fight). For me, it doesn't necessarily have to be a manager of the exact same ideology or type. But similarities and some similar foundations (in line with modern football, but not another Rodgers, let's call it that way)? That would be nice. We'll see what we're left with, upstairs and in terms of playing roster when that happens, what's out there. Hopefully this time we can be even more attractive in general than last time.
 



Limiescouse

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At some point Klopp has to leave. But one thing that I really don't understand is why clubs don't openly succession plan. So when Klopp decides to go, can he not say that this is my last season - then an assistant (like Pep Linders) is groomed, or someone else is brought in to prepare in that last season. Klopp may go and along with him Peter Krawitc, but the rest of the coaching team stays - including Edwards, and the transition for a new manager is not so abrupt.

Barca did that when Pep Guardiola took over. And they have recruited from within plenty recently. This is the way I'd like to see our club do -but otherwise have a plan.

Meanwhile, lets juice every minute of this while we can.
It undermines the authority of the person in charge to have them work out their time like that. It is a relationship business and people are always looking to address the relationship with the person who will be making decisions. If the targeted replacement is already at the club it creates conflict in terms of who the players are really trying to please.

As for Pep, he was not an example of successful transition planning. The guy with the job was sacked for poor performance and Pep was given the job. It was hardly a seamless transition with what he did to the playing squad either.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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It undermines the authority of the person in charge to have them work out their time like that. It is a relationship business and people are always looking to address the relationship with the person who will be making decisions. If the targeted replacement is already at the club it creates conflict in terms of who the players are really trying to please.

As for Pep, he was not an example of successful transition planning. The guy with the job was sacked for poor performance and Pep was given the job. It was hardly a seamless transition with what he did to the playing squad either.
I can see where he's coming from with Pep, he was announced as their next manager well before the end of Pellegrini's reign. I'm fairly sure I remember they didn't do too badly in that season (the details elude me) compared to what happened the first time Ferguson announced his retirement, and maybe at least part of that was because of the knowledge they were likely already playing to impress such a huge name in the sport who was about to be their new boss.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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He was talking about Barca.
FFS, you don't expect me to remember what was posted yesterday, or read the post you were quoting, do you, you monster? lol

FWIW that situation at City might bear some relevance to us, obviously Klopp wouldn't be leaving in the same circumstances, but if he did at some point signal that he was intending to leave on a set date, it wouldn't be the worst idea in the world if we started our planning at that point, rather than what we usually seem to do and only start responding to something once it's already happened.
 



RedYank

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I'm not sure about that to be honest. Look at any man going from 48 to 52 years old: it's usually the years where someone goes from being a young man to a not-so-young man... I'm not sure that it has to do something with the pressure of being Liverpool manager. And if you look at a guy like Ancelotti, he is still managing a club at 60, and doesn't look like he'll stop soon.

I also don't believe that it isn't possible anymore to do a Wenger or a Ferguson. Both retired a few years ago only, and it was age catching up with them, rather than the exceeding pressure which got the better out of them in the end. Both of them lived through the change towards the current circus football has become, and both managed to adapt very well.

In my opinion, lack of longevity in current football has much more to do with impatient owners and fans who think that the grass is greener elsewhere and want to chop and change whenever results dovetail a bit. fsg however are the patient kind of owners andf tend to look at the long term. They know that with Klopp, they have a genuine world-class coach on their hands. His ultra-consistent approach to his work and the recent success has bought him a lot of time, just like at Dortmund. No reasonable owner would sack him on short notice, so he has very much something in him which you can compare with Wenger or Ferguson.

At the end of the day, for a manager who is well-settled into a club and can distribute the work at hand among people he's able to trust, pressure will be considerably lesser than if he must start at a new job and a new city or even country every three-four years to reconstruct a club which has problems. With Klopp's patient long-term approach, and with the way he's able to keep the players and everyone at the club behind him and build his squad piece by piece, pressure would tend to become rather less than more, especially as his working method tends to end up with a high-level consistency in terms of performances and results.

So, I for one don't think that it is the pressure which will decide Kloppo's longevity at LFC. It will be Jürgen himself. But where would he go from here? To Madrid or Barca who chop and change their head coach every two years? To Bayern, who have the same tendency? Back to Dortmund? Can't see it myself.

He'll maybe want to manage the German national team at some point, but it could also well be that he'll never manage a national team anyway, as what he loves most is to work on a daily basis with the players. That's where he is most effective, and he wouldn't have that with a national team.

Also, I'm quite sure that Klopp is the kind of guy who will never be able to stay far away from a football pitch. He needs the energy and adrenalin which comes with the job. He needs the passion coming from the fans, and to be able to share it with them. Can you see him retiring in two years, and from then on living a quiet life as a pensioner for the next thirty years? Never, he needs football to be alive, and that's why he'll probably, health permitting, become one of the longest-serving managers in the game.

But again, where to go for him after Liverpool? For me, it's quite simple: the encounter between Klopp and LFC is a match made in heaven. Why break up a match made in heaven? It makes no sense, he's here to stay.
So beautifully put...bravo!

A completely unique individual. I cannot comment descriptively as to other football managers in Europe, so have been attempting to find a comparison over here (in any sport). I really cannot.

Belichick has the detail and organization skills...but no personality. Urban Meyer (had) intensity/detail and the love of his players, but had no joy.

I could go on, but simply observing all you so wonderfully penned about a truly one of a kind person.
 

Red_Jedi

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He was talking about Barca. Barca incidentally have not looked to within for their manager since the ill fated rein of Tito
The point I’m trying to make is that clubs appoint and sack managers haphazardly - some more than others. There is nothing wrong with trying to do something differently. Shankly left us with a dynasty that continued his work, if there was a way Klopp could do the same....
 

redfanman

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The point I’m trying to make is that clubs appoint and sack managers haphazardly - some more than others. There is nothing wrong with trying to do something differently. Shankly left us with a dynasty that continued his work, if there was a way Klopp could do the same....
Sure, but that is an exceptionally rare situation, and it started to break down when Kenny was given the job. If it was straightforward more clubs would be doing it.
 

Abdel

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Dont know where to put this one from the Athletic
As soon as the lap of honour was complete in Istanbul’s Vodafone Park, Liverpool’s backroom staff swung into action.

By that stage it was already the early hours of Thursday morning. There was little time to dwell on the glory of being crowned UEFA Super Cup winners after a penalty shootout victory over Chelsea.

There were ice baths to run, recovery shakes to be dished out and video analysis to be pored over. The next assignment was just around the corner and Jurgen Klopp knew that it was laced with danger.

Privately, the scheduling had angered the Liverpool manager. He couldn’t understand why his side had been handed a Saturday afternoon showdown away to Southampton in the Premier League so soon after a 3,500-mile round trip to Turkey.

But Klopp also knew that publicly complaining would achieve little other than giving his players a ready-made excuse to stumble on the south coast.

Instead a detailed plan had been drawn up to ensure that Liverpool did everything in their power to ensure that fatigue wasn’t a determining factor against Saints, who had the luxury of a full week to prepare and were smarting from a heavy opening weekend defeat to Burnley.

The decision had been taken to stay at the luxurious Ritz-Carlton Hotel close to Besiktas’ home in Istanbul post-match rather than immediately fly home to Merseyside. It was just after 2am local time when the squad returned to their base but all the clocks in the players’ rooms had been put back two hours in line with UK time.

Captain Jordan Henderson didn’t return for a further hour-and-a-half as he was forced to wait in Vodafone Park, desperately trying to rehydrate after an exhausting night in order to provide a urine sample. Xherdan Shaqiri was also randomly selected for a drugs test but, having not featured over the course of the 120 minutes, had no such issues.

The following morning brought an early start for head physio Lee Nobes and long-serving masseur Paul Small as they got to work on weary limbs in the hotel.

Among their five-strong team was physio Jose Luis Rodriguez Robledo. The Spaniard had enjoyed an eventful evening in Istanbul. Having gone into the stands to get his national flag for goalkeeper Adrian during the post-match celebrations, stewards mistook him for a pitch invader when he returned to the field. Twice, they tried to drag him away – much to the amusement of his fellow staff members.

After breakfast, those squad players who didn’t get on in the Super Cup embarked on an intensive core session in the gym led by head of fitness and conditioning Andreas Kornmayer.

On their four-hour afternoon flight back to Liverpool the treatment continued for Klopp’s walking wounded. Nobes, who joined the club from Manchester City last November, spent three of those hours working solidly on Adrian’s ankle. It had swelled up considerably overnight after he had been wiped out by a supporter who had ran on to the field after the penalty shootout.

Without Nobes’ expertise, the former West Ham keeper would have had no chance of playing at St Mary’s.

James Milner was also regarded as a major doubt with a heavily bruised leg after taking a kick against Chelsea and was tended to on the plane.

The ‘Game Ready’ icing machine was regularly filled and passed around the players. Developed by scientists and doctors using NASA space suit technology, it circulates cold water from an ice reservoir through a wrap which is applied to the injured area of the body and provides compression as well as ice treatment.

Having landed back in Liverpool just before 4.30pm on Thursday, the players had cars at the airport and were able to head straight home to their families.

For Klopp and his staff there was still work to be done as they got together to study the video analysis assistant boss Peter Krawietz and his team had pulled together on Southampton.

They talked about dealing with Saints’ threat from set-pieces, their direct style and how crucial it would be to win the second balls.

At 1pm on Friday the players reported back to Melwood where the importance of rest and nutrition over the following 24 hours was drummed into them. Signs around the inner sanctum of the training ground read ‘Carb Power’.

A light training session lasted less than an hour with Klopp knowing that overexerting his players would be counter-productive on what was essentially their second recovery day.

Going outside was preceded by the video analysis team meeting as the manager picked out examples of Southampton’s strengths and weaknesses. “Massive,” was how one staff member described the significance of that information to Saturday’s outcome.

“It’s so difficult trying to prepare when you only have one light session between games so that’s when using the video becomes such a powerful tool. The manager was calm. He told everyone he wasn’t interested in excuses.”

At 6pm on Friday they flew to Southampton and headed to the Hilton at the Ageas Bowl. Nobes and Small were busy again. The players ate together, had treatment and then slept.

On Saturday morning Adrian passed a fitness test on his sore ankle before the squad went for a leisurely stroll close to the home of Hampshire County Cricket Club.

Klopp had described the game to his players as “the biggest banana skin in history”.

“Everybody is waiting for it, probably all the headlines are written already,” he said. “I would prefer the headline: ‘The mentality giants were in town’.”

The manager had decided that fresh legs in midfield was vital. Henderson and Fabinho had played 120 minutes in the Super Cup so they would make way.

Gini Wijnaldum and James Milner, who had each featured for an hour in Istanbul, would have Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain for company. Shifting Oxlade-Chamberlain from wide on the left to a central role created space for Roberto Firmino’s return to the starting line up.

It was a big show of faith in Oxlade-Chamberlain considering how he had struggled in the first half of the Super Cup. But he looked so much more comfortable in the middle and Klopp’s gamble in handing him a first Premier League start since April 2018 paid off handsomely.

For most of the opening 45 minutes it was a scrappy, disjointed affair. Possession was tossed away far too easily. As well as a predictable hangover of sorts from their midweek exploits, Liverpool were caught out by Saints’ set-up.

Instead of the 5-4-1 formation they had planned for, it was 5-3-2. That gave the hosts more of a threat through the middle but also meant there was more space out wide for Klopp’s men to exploit.

Liverpool’s failure to make the most of that in the first half featured heavily in the half-time team talk at St Mary’s. Sadio Mane’s stunning finish had lifted the mood but the bar still needed to be raised. Full-backs Trent Alexander-Arnold and Andy Robertson were told in no uncertain terms that they needed to be operating further up the field.

Switching play quickly from one flank to the other in order to really stretch Saints started to pay dividends as Liverpool dominated the second half. Midfielders were quicker to get up in support of Mane, Firmino and Mohamed Salah.

Rather than wilt physically, Liverpool grew stronger. They counter-pressed better as a unit. The value of the gruelling fitness drills during the pre-season training camp in Evian came to the fore.

So did Klopp’s attention to detail and pursuit of marginal gains. Some were sceptical last season when it emerged that he had enlisted the services of throw-in coach Thomas Gronnemark.

But the players have bought into it and the Dane’s impact is clear. Both of Liverpool’s goals at St Mary’s came via that route.

The second involved Mane robbing the ball off Jan Bednarek and feeding Firmino, who hammered home from the edge of the box. Nerves were jangling when Adrian’s blunder enabled Danny Ings to pull one back but Liverpool held on.

“It’s a massive result for us,” Robertson told The Athletic. “We got no favours playing Wednesday night in Turkey and being given a 3pm Saturday kick-off away.

“I think we could have been looked after a wee bit better but getting another three points on the board is all that matters. We knew we would have to dig deep, especially having had extra time in midweek.

“We stayed resilient and compact. Our mentality is so strong. When your preparation isn’t ideal, it’s all about finding a way to win and we did that.”

An 11th straight league win – equalling the club’s best run of the Premier League era – was all the sweeter as Manchester City were held by Tottenham later in the day. Liverpool still haven’t dropped a point since March.

Despite the body blow of losing No 1 Alisson Becker to a torn calf, they emerged from an energy-sapping week with the Super Cup and six points out of six.

Their latest triumph owed much to the team behind the team. A truly collective effort.

In the away dressing room at St Mary’s following Saturday’s game, assistant boss Pep Lijnders declared that he had “good news and bad news”.

“The bad news is that Adam (Lallana), Joe (Gomez) and Hendo (Jordan Henderson), you have to go back outside and run,” he said. “The good news is that you’ve all got two days off.”

Nobody can say they haven’t earned a breather.
 



Red_Jedi

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Sure, but that is an exceptionally rare situation, and it started to break down when Kenny was given the job. If it was straightforward more clubs would be doing it.
I’m not sure it broke down with Kenny... club decided to go with souness rather than Ronnie Moran or Roy Evans. They then went back to Roy Evans but the boot room didn’t exist in the same way... and hence houllier, Rafa etc.

But now their looks to be a type of “boot room” - pep linders and kornmeyer belong to Liverpool - only Kravitz is Klopp’s man.
 



redfanman

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I’m not sure it broke down with Kenny... club decided to go with souness rather than Ronnie Moran or Roy Evans. They then went back to Roy Evans but the boot room didn’t exist in the same way... and hence houllier, Rafa etc.

But now their looks to be a type of “boot room” - pep linders and kornmeyer belong to Liverpool - only Kravitz is Klopp’s man.
None of the boot room were willing or able to take up the role of Manager permanently following the loss of Fagan. Kenny chose to do so while he was still a player and so while it still functioned, the fact that a player had to take on the Key role suggests the boot room wasnt capable of sustaining it's promotions.

The club went for Souness because he was an ex player - and that was the way to try to keep the link to the past the same - that backfired because he wasnt interested in that. Likewise, by the time Evans took over, he wasnt really good enough for the job and other than Moran probably didnt have the know how at the club and experience available to benefit from - seeing another attempt to bring in someone else from outside with a tenous link to the club via his time as a sports teacher who had visited the city.

I think it is too early to say who is Klopp's men. It is entirely possible that Kornmeyer and others will wish to follow him out the club. Pep may stay on if he takes the main job.
 

andyclegs

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I feel that just like a rumour in work - believe it when it happens and in this case; pray that it doesn't. Klopp has been the best signing FSG will ever make. Everything fits - he was born to manage this club - his destiny. Let's hope he stays for at least another 5 years - just think how good we could be then!!! As the one post said though, whatever happens, the club will go on.
 

mattyhurst

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He will go when he feels he has achieved all he set out to achieve.

Winning that trophy last season I think helps him, I think he will stay another 5 personally. I think then he will step aside.
 



lfc.eddie

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There's something sadomacist over it, like they yearm for the frustrated times to come back or something ?! creeps me out a bit.
I think a lot of people, me included, in here didn't know Klopp's contract runs perpetually. We thought his contract has a fixed expiry date....
 

Incognito

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Let’s just enjoy the ride for however long it lasts and if he does decide to go then I wish him well. Cross that bridge when it happens.
Yeah, and these questions to him keep popping every other interview. There's another one today that mentions he'll take a break post 2022. Media will do anything to create panic. And it's not like he'll come out and say I am here forever lads, chill.
They should rather question Ole by when he's planning to stay. Now that would be a funny interview