The Owners

shachart

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The next statement is a bit of a paradox, but here goes. There is no denying that the owners have done a terrific job balancing the club on the financial and operational side, and with the aid of one Jurgen Klopp are now the proud owners of the best football club in the world.
If you look back to the our clubs history, shanks brought us to be a top club, but we never relied on a specific manager to maintain our place on "the perch " . None of the managers after Shanks managed the club for a long period of time.
While Utd under Fergie and Arsenal under Wenger were able to mass quite a few titles during their reign, once they have left, their clubs are in miserable shape.
We know FSG do not believe in throwing money at the problem. I doubt they will ever try to buy players to buy wins ( see City, Barcelona, PSG, Madrid, and former Chelsea ), so that means FSG should not extend Klopp's contract again, but rather work on his replacement, to achieve continuity.

Yes, as weird as it sounds, no matter how good we are up until 2024, or even more to the point especially if we are back on our perch, FSG should reward Klopp by replacing him.
 

epsomred

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The next statement is a bit of a paradox, but here goes. There is no denying that the owners have done a terrific job balancing the club on the financial and operational side, and with the aid of one Jurgen Klopp are now the proud owners of the best football club in the world.
If you look back to the our clubs history, shanks brought us to be a top club, but we never relied on a specific manager to maintain our place on "the perch " . None of the managers after Shanks managed the club for a long period of time.
While Utd under Fergie and Arsenal under Wenger were able to mass quite a few titles during their reign, once they have left, their clubs are in miserable shape.
We know FSG do not believe in throwing money at the problem. I doubt they will ever try to buy players to buy wins ( see City, Barcelona, PSG, Madrid, and former Chelsea ), so that means FSG should not extend Klopp's contract again, but rather work on his replacement, to achieve continuity.

Yes, as weird as it sounds, no matter how good we are up until 2024, or even more to the point especially if we are back on our perch, FSG should reward Klopp by replacing him.
Yes I agree, Klopp out !
 

Anfield rd Dreamer

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Not! Even! As! A! Joke!

*for one thing screenshots, quotes etc can be used not just by other posters but by opposition fans and unscrupulous journalists to try and make us look stupid and sow discord.
 

Hope in your heart

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The next statement is a bit of a paradox, but here goes. There is no denying that the owners have done a terrific job balancing the club on the financial and operational side, and with the aid of one Jurgen Klopp are now the proud owners of the best football club in the world.
If you look back to the our clubs history, shanks brought us to be a top club, but we never relied on a specific manager to maintain our place on "the perch " . None of the managers after Shanks managed the club for a long period of time.
While Utd under Fergie and Arsenal under Wenger were able to mass quite a few titles during their reign, once they have left, their clubs are in miserable shape.
We know FSG do not believe in throwing money at the problem. I doubt they will ever try to buy players to buy wins ( see City, Barcelona, PSG, Madrid, and former Chelsea ), so that means FSG should not extend Klopp's contract again, but rather work on his replacement, to achieve continuity.

Yes, as weird as it sounds, no matter how good we are up until 2024, or even more to the point especially if we are back on our perch, FSG should reward Klopp by replacing him.
"None of the managers after Shanks managed the club for a long period of time."

Bob Paisley: nine years of a glorious reign at LFC. :unsure:
Fagan: two years of great succes. He retired just after the Heysel drama, otherwise he'd have continued for a longer time I guess.
Dalglish: six years with a lot of success. He eventually retired because Hillsborough had taken too much out of him.

After that, the club fell into pieces compared to what it was before. Even though an ownership change in 1991 didn't help, it's fair to say that we paid a heavy price for Heysel and Hillsborough. They cost us two brilliant managers who would have stayed longer than they did. The fact that they didn't cost us dearly in the end.

I don't think that your point stands to be honest. When you've got hold of a genius like Klopp, a man who so obviously matches everything this club stands for, there is no hesitation: you hold him as long as you can while letting himself decide when it's time to go.
 

Anfield rd Dreamer

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"None of the managers after Shanks managed the club for a long period of time."

Bob Paisley: nine years of a glorious reign at LFC. :unsure:
Fagan: two years of great succes. He retired just after the Heysel drama, otherwise he'd have continued for a longer time I guess.
Dalglish: six years with a lot of success. He eventually retired because Hillsborough had taken too much out of him.

After that, the club fell into pieces compared to what it was before. Even though an ownership change in 1991 didn't help, it's fair to say that we paid a heavy price for Heysel and Hillsborough. They cost us two brilliant managers who would have stayed longer than they did. The fact that they didn't cost us dearly in the end.

I don't think that your point stands to be honest. When you've got hold of a genius like Klopp, a man who so obviously matches everything this club stands for, there is no hesitation: you hold him as long as you can while letting himself decide when it's time to go.
And work with him to put a succession plan together so success, playing style, club identity and culture of the club continues and progresses under the new manager (maybe a little personalisation and tweaks) instead of ripping all that up and the new guy starting from scratch "my way or the highway" style!
 

redbj

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The next statement is a bit of a paradox, but here goes. There is no denying that the owners have done a terrific job balancing the club on the financial and operational side, and with the aid of one Jurgen Klopp are now the proud owners of the best football club in the world.
If you look back to the our clubs history, shanks brought us to be a top club, but we never relied on a specific manager to maintain our place on "the perch " . None of the managers after Shanks managed the club for a long period of time.
While Utd under Fergie and Arsenal under Wenger were able to mass quite a few titles during their reign, once they have left, their clubs are in miserable shape.
We know FSG do not believe in throwing money at the problem. I doubt they will ever try to buy players to buy wins ( see City, Barcelona, PSG, Madrid, and former Chelsea ), so that means FSG should not extend Klopp's contract again, but rather work on his replacement, to achieve continuity.

Yes, as weird as it sounds, no matter how good we are up until 2024, or even more to the point especially if we are back on our perch, FSG should reward Klopp by replacing him.
Persecute the heretic.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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And work with him to put a succession plan together so success, playing style, club identity and culture of the club continues and progresses under the new manager (maybe a little personalisation and tweaks) instead of ripping all that up and the new guy starting from scratch "my way or the highway" style!
The point about continuity, and his rise during his time at the club, is what makes me think Lijnders is being groomed to step up once Klopp decides it's time to go. Not entirely sure how I'd feel about that, but it's just the way I think it's going.
 

[email protected]

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The point about continuity, and his rise during his time at the club, is what makes me think Lijnders is being groomed to step up once Klopp decides it's time to go. Not entirely sure how I'd feel about that, but it's just the way I think it's going.
It's a long way down the line but there is likely to also be a clamour for Gerrard's name to be thrown into the mix which has me a wee bit nervous even now.
 

Zinedine Biscan

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It's a long way down the line but there is likely to also be a clamour for Gerrard's name to be thrown into the mix which has me a wee bit nervous even now.
Yeah, more so than Pep (for me anyway), weirdly - probably because while Pep has remained at the club learning at Klopp's feet, Gerrard is off doing his own thing. I feel like if it's continuity you're looking for (and why not), then bringing in Gerrard would involve a lot more disruption to the way we play.
 

Abdel

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It's a long way down the line but there is likely to also be a clamour for Gerrard's name to be thrown into the mix which has me a wee bit nervous even now.
I really hope that we will not take this path, neither Gerrard nor Pep will be able to ensure the relief and guarantee the continuity, it is obvious because both not neither the baggage nor the experience to lead a club which aspires to stay among the elite During the last 30 years, it is not a coincidence that the rare times that we have had success, it was under the thumb of a world class coach (Rafa and Klopp), if I were the owners, I I would even be tempted to go to the Spanish Pep, he has a particular admiration for the club, and whether we like it or not, he is a sure guarantee for continuity and success precisely. in addition, he knows that he can win the champions league with us, a big argument to bring him, because he starts to feel frustrated in this competition, a win -win situation
 

Limiescouse

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Not sure if anyone outside the US has heard this, but Henry and Werner have just had to fire their manager of the Red Sox who has been put right at the center of a cheating scandal that has now sullied the winners of 2 consecutive World Series winners. They were left with no real choice but to fire the guy, but it is notable that they did so immediately, even before the league had the chance to impose any sanctions on him.
 

Lowton_Red

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Not sure if anyone outside the US has heard this, but Henry and Werner have just had to fire their manager of the Red Sox who has been put right at the center of a cheating scandal that has now sullied the winners of 2 consecutive World Series winners. They were left with no real choice but to fire the guy, but it is notable that they did so immediately, even before the league had the chance to impose any sanctions on him.
Wasn't this down to his involvement in alleged "sign stealing"?
 

Limiescouse

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Yes. It's long been a generally accepted albeit challenged part of the game. If you can pick up on tells the pitcher has as to what pitch he is going to throw then you take advantage of it. In rugby you are always looking to decode the line out throw cues, and in cricket you're looking for little things about grip and hand motion to figure out what ball is going to be bowled. Sign stealing has always been a little beyond that though as it has always involved a coordinated effort among players to decode and then communicate the signal to whomever needs it. Typically it is a case of getting a runner on second base who can get a good look at the catcher's signs and then communicating that back to the hitter. Whether this is really a breach of etiquette is not universally agreed upon.

Where this case became so brazen was the Astros used cameras to try to get views of the catcher's signals and relayed that footage back to a booth for staff to try to decode with players then sending signals out to the field in real time. It went from game intelligence to concerted, coordinated institutional cheating. The reason the Red Sox got caught up in it is one of the main assistants at Houston in the 2017 win was subsequently hired to be the manager in Boston and he immediately created a similar system there that they used en route to their world series win that year. The actual report on the Red Sox has not even been published yet but there is enough in the one on the Astros and Corra's involvement there that Henry and Werner were really left with no choice.
 
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sportbilly1966

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Yes. It's long been a generally accepted albeit challenged part of the game. If you can pick up on tells the pitcher has as to what pitch he is going to throw then you take advantage of it. In rugby you are always looking to decode the line out throw cues, and in cricket you're looking for little things about grip and hand motion to figure out what ball is going to be bowled. Sign stealing has always been a little beyond that though as it has always involved a coordinated effort among players to decode and then communicate the signal to whomever needs it. Typically it is a case of getting a runner on second base who can get a good look at the catcher's signs and then communicating that back to the hitter. Whether this is really a breach of etiquette is not universally agreed upon.

Where this case became so brazen was the Astros used cameras to try to get views of the catcher's signals and relayed that footage back to a booth for staff to try to decode with players then sending signals out to the field in real time. It went from game intelligence to concerted, coordinated institutional cheating. The reason the Red Sox got caught up in it is one of the main assistants at Houston in the 2017 win was subsequently hired to be the manager in Boston and he immediately created a similar system there that they used en route to their world series win that year. The actual report on the Red Sox has not even been published yet but there is enough in the one on the Astros and Corra's involvement there that Henry and Werner were really left with no choice.
Just seems a load of tosh imo if you use signals that is the risk, as in other sports say basketball where they have different set plays coaches/players will know from set ups what will be coming and as you mentioned in cricket bowlers for the opposition will be scrutinised for tgeir hand positions.
 

Limiescouse

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I think you must have missed the bit that identified how this goes beyond simply picking up on tells like how the bowler is holding the ball or other things that an observant player can pick up from watching what is happening in the open.
 

redfanman

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You know, I dont exactly think of Arsenal as best in class for injury management and prevention.
That was my first thought too. How much of that is likely to be down to factors beyond the medical team's control?
 

Limiescouse

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That was my first thought too. How much of that is likely to be down to factors beyond the medical team's control?
Theoretically it could be a ton. For instance, I dont know that pulled hamstrings are really under that department's purview. In practice, who knows. Another thing to consider is whether our perception is even fair. I guess I havent thought about it for a while and these sorts of reputations tend to stick around longer than they deserve to.